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African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (25)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations.[X]
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Politics and government. (7)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Social conditions. (5)
Political campaigns -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (5)
African American dramatists -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (4)
African American theater -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (4)
African Americans in the performing arts -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (4)
Community development, Urban -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (4)
Karamu House. (4)
Race discrimination -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (4)
Social settlements -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (4)
Theater -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (4)
African American politicians -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (3)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Social policy. (3)
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Cleveland Branch. (3)
Urban renewal -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (3)
Administrative agencies -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Records and correspondence. (2)
African American mayors -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
African American women -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
African Americans -- Civil rights -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
African Americans -- Employment -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
African Americans -- Housing -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
Afro-American women journalists -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
Charities -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
City planning -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
Civil rights -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
Civil rights movements -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Economic conditions. (2)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Economic policy. (2)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Officials and employees. (2)
Cleveland (Ohio). City Council. (2)
Discrimination in housing -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
Forbes, George L., 1931- (2)
Glenville Shootout, Cleveland, Ohio, 1968. (2)
Housing -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
Hughes, Langston, 1902-1967. (2)
Jelliffe, Rowena Woodham, 1892-1992. (2)
Jelliffe, Russell W., 1891-1980. (2)
Journalists -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
Race relations and the press -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
Rural-urban migration -- United States. (2)
School integration -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
Second Presbyterian Church (Cleveland, Ohio) Men's Club. (2)
Silver, Dorothy, 1929- (2)
Silver, Reuben, 1925- (2)
Social action -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
Stokes, Carl. (2)
Urban policy -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
White, Charles William, 1897-1970. (2)
White, Stella G., 1907-1991. (2)
Women journalists -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
Youth -- Employment -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
Affirmative action programs -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Africa American women authors -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
African American business enterprises -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
African American judges -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Miscellanea. (1)
African American judges -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
African American lawyers -- Ohio -- Cleveland (1)
African American lawyers -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
African American politicians -- Ohio -- Cleveland (1)
African Americans -- Civil rights (1)
African Americans -- Social conditions. (1)
Afro-American women journalists -- Georgia -- Dawsonville. (1)
Aged -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Air -- Pollution -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Black power -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Boycott -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Businessmen -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Charitable contributions. (1)
Businessmen -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Businessmen's Interracial Committee on Community Affairs (Cleveland, Ohio) (1)
Camp Cleveland (Cleveland, Ohio) (1)
Charitable uses, trusts, and foundations -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Civil rights workers -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Clark, Harold T. (Harold Terry), 1882-1965. (1)
Clergy -- Ohio -- Shaker Heights. (1)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Appropriations and expenditures. (1)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Church history -- Sources. (1)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations -- Economic aspects. (1)
Cleveland (Ohio). Mayor's Council on Youth Opportunities. (1)
Cleveland Metropolitan Housing Authority. (1)
Cleveland Transit System. (1)
Cleveland: NOW! (1)
Cleveland: NOW! -- Archives. (1)
Community centers -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Community development corporations -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Davis family. (1)
Davis, Russell Howard, 1897-1976. (1)
Dawson County (Ga.). (1)
Discrimination in employment -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Discrimination in housing -- Law and legislation -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Episcopal Church -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Societies, etc. (1)
Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity. Cleveland Chapter -- Archives. (1)
Evans, Fred (Fred Ahmed), d.1978. (1)
Fast food restaurants -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Franchises (Retail trade) -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Fund raising -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Future Outlook League. (1)
Gilpin Players. (1)
Greater Cleveland Associated Foundation. (1)
Health planning -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Hough (Cleveland, Ohio) (1)
Housing rehabilitation -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Job creation -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Journalists -- Georgia -- Dawsonville. (1)
Judges -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Miscellanea. (1)
Karamu Foundation. (1)
Lewis, Fannie M., 1926- (1)
Local transit -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Lyons, Frank, 1894-1974. (1)
McDonald's Corporation. (1)
Minority business enterprises -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Cleveland Branch -- Archives. (1)
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Cleveland Branch -- History. (1)
Near West Side Multi-Service Center (Cleveland, Ohio) (1)
Norton, James Adolph, 1922- (1)
Operation Black Unity. (1)
Pennybacker, Albert M., ca. 1930- (1)
Picketing -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Political clubs -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Poor -- Ohio -- Cleveland (1)
Race relations -- Religious aspects -- Episcopal Church. (1)
Recreation and juvenile delinquency. (1)
Republican Party (Cuyahoga County, Ohio) (1)
Social work with youth -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Social workers -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Stokes family (1)
Stokes, Carl (1)
Stokes, Louis (1)
Urban League of Cleveland -- Archives. (1)
Urban League of Cleveland. (1)
White family. (1)
Women journalists -- Georgia -- Dawsonville. (1)
Women social workers -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Youth -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Recreation. (1)
Youth -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
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1Title:  National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Cleveland Branch Records, Series II     
 Creator:  National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Cleveland Branch 
 Dates:  1913-1923 
 Abstract:  The Cleveland Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) is the northeast Ohio chapter of the national organization devoted to civil and political equality. It was founded in 1912. CThe cllection consists of copies of correspondence with enclosures and branch bulletins, mostly generated by Harry E. Davis. The collection pertains primarily to the formation of the Cleveland Branch and the Cleveland College Chapter of the NAACP as well as the social conditions of Cleveland African Americans in the early 20th century. 
 Call #:  MS 4475 
 Extent:  0.20 linear feet (1 container) 
 Subjects:  National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Cleveland Branch -- Archives. | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Race discrimination -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations.
 
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2Title:  National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Cleveland Branch Records     
 Creator:  National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Cleveland Branch 
 Dates:  1922-1969 
 Abstract:  The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) is a social and political action organization founded in 1912 as a Cleveland, Ohio, branch of the NAACP. Its purpose is to oppose racial inequalities in civil and political rights. The collection consists of reports, minutes, office files, financial records, newspaper clippings, brochures, pamphlets, broadsides, speeches, news releases and insurance policies. 
 Call #:  MS 3520 
 Extent:  26.40 linear feet (70 containers) 
 Subjects:  National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Cleveland Branch. | School integration -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Race discrimination -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations.
 
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3Title:  Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity, Cleveland Chapter Records     
 Creator:  Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity, Cleveland Chapter 
 Dates:  1961-1968 
 Abstract:  The Cleveland, Ohio, chapter of the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity was the local chapter of a national organization (f. 1961) open to members in communion with the Protestant Episcopal Church. The Cleveland Chapter supported the 1968 presidential campaign of Eugene McCarthy, and the "Poor People's" Campaign with monetary and food contributions, while opposing the Vietnamese War. The collection consists of bylaws, minutes, an address by the Right Reverend John Harris Burt, membership lists, and a membership card file. 
 Call #:  MS 4199 
 Extent:  0.10 linear feet (1 container) 
 Subjects:  Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity. Cleveland Chapter -- Archives. | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Race relations -- Religious aspects -- Episcopal Church. | Episcopal Church -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Societies, etc. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations.
 
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4Title:  Charles W. White Papers     
 Creator:  White, Charles W. 
 Dates:  1920-1970 
 Abstract:  Charles W. White (1897-1970) was a Cleveland, Ohio, attorney who became Assistant Law Director for Cleveland (1933-1955) and Common Pleas Court judge (1955-1970). He was active in African American rights organizations and civic affairs. The collection consists of correspondence, speeches, newspaper clippings, awards, certificates, legal files, scrapbooks, and other papers, relating to the public and personal life of Judge White and to his activities as a member of the Urban League, NAACP, ACLU, Consumers League, East End Community Center, Karamu House, and Friends of the Cleveland Public Library. 
 Call #:  MS 3521 
 Extent:  25.61 linear feet (58 containers, 6 oversize volumes, 2 oversize folders, and 1 roll) 
 Subjects:  White, Charles William, 1897-1970. | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African Americans -- Social conditions. | African Americans -- Civil rights -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African American judges -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Miscellanea. | Judges -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Miscellanea. | Civil rights movements -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations.
 
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5Title:  Albert M. Pennybacker Papers     
 Creator:  Pennybacker, Albert M. 
 Dates:  1963-1974 
 Abstract:  Albert Pennybacker was a civil rights activist and pastor of Heights Christian Church in the Cleveland, Ohio, suburb of Shaker Heights. The collection consists of correspondence with civil rights workers and organizations, including the Cleveland Board of Education, the League of Women Voters of Shaker Heights, the Welfare Federation, and Rabbi Arthur J. Lelyveld. Also included are committee minutes and reports, newsletters, newspaper clippings, and news releases of groups including the Citizens' Commission of Shaker Heights, the Cleveland Interfaith Housing Corporation, the Emergency Clergy Committee on Civil Rights, Laymen for Civil Rights, and the Ludlow Community Association. 
 Call #:  MS 3743 
 Extent:  0.40 linear feet (1 container) 
 Subjects:  Pennybacker, Albert M., ca. 1930- | Civil rights movements -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Civil rights workers -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Clergy -- Ohio -- Shaker Heights. | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations.
 
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6Title:  Charles W. White Family Papers     
 Creator:  White, Charles W. Family 
 Dates:  1872-1977 
 Abstract:  Charles W. White (1897-1970), a lawyer and judge, and his wife Stella, a writer and journalist, were both active in African American rights organizations and civic affairs in Cleveland, Ohio. White had one daughter, Lillian. The collection consists of clippings, correspondence of White and his daughter Lillian, an original manuscript by Stella White, family history and biographical materials, and memorabilia. 
 Call #:  MS 4114 
 Extent:  0.40 linear feet (1 container) 
 Subjects:  White family. | White, Charles William, 1897-1970. | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African American judges -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Africa American women authors -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations.
 
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7Title:  Frank Lyons Papers     
 Creator:  Lyons, Frank 
 Dates:  1912-1961 
 Abstract:  Frank Lyons (1894-1974) was a lawyer, politician and civic leader active in Cleveland, Ohio's African American community. The collection consists of correspondence dealing with Lyons' law career, political involvement, and personal life, as well as organizational records, political campaign files, appointment books and journals, and legal case materials, including discrimination suits Lyons handled for the Future Outlook League and Robert Woodall. The collection pertains to Lyons' political aspirations and activities in various ward clubs, his community service in such organizations as the Urban League, St. Marks Presbyterian Church, and the Woodland Center Neighborhood House, and his discrimination cases. 
 Call #:  MS 4249 
 Extent:  2.40 linear feet (3 containers) 
 Subjects:  Lyons, Frank, 1894-1974. | Republican Party (Cuyahoga County, Ohio) | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Political campaigns -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Political clubs -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Race discrimination -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Church history -- Sources. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations.
 
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8Title:  Businessmen's Interracial Committee on Community Affairs Records     
 Creator:  Businessmen's Interracial Committee on Community Affairs 
 Dates:  1964-1972 
 Abstract:  The Businessmen's Interracial Committee on Community Affairs (BICCA) was organized in 1964 in Cleveland, Ohio, at a time of unrest in the community, in order to establish communication and develop understanding between leaders of Cleveland's business and African American communities. The BICCA was a committee of the Greater Cleveland Associated Foundation, which provided funding, services, and facilities. Additional financial support was supplied by local corporations. The collection consists of a report on the beginnings and early activity of the Committee, with copies of relevant articles, correspondence, and subcommittee reports, as well as annual reports. 
 Call #:  MS 4668 
 Extent:  0.10 linear feet (1 container) 
 Subjects:  Businessmen's Interracial Committee on Community Affairs (Cleveland, Ohio) | Greater Cleveland Associated Foundation. | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Businessmen -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations -- Economic aspects.
 
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9Title:  James Adolph Norton Papers     
 Creator:  Norton, James Adolph 
 Dates:  1960-1968 
 Abstract:  James Adolph Norton was a professor of public administration at various colleges and universities around the country before moving to Cleveland, Ohio, where he served as Director of the Cleveland Foundation, chairman of the Housing Committee of the Urban League of Cleveland, and president of the American Society of Public Administrators in the 1960s. The collection consists of minutes, agendas, reports, correspondence, and publications, regarding activities of the Urban League, particularly work of the Housing Committee. Included is a report issued by the Urban League's Research Department entitled The Negro in Cleveland, 1950-1963, and issues of its two newsletters, Flash, and Stride. 
 Call #:  MS 4539 
 Extent:  0.20 linear feet (1 container) 
 Subjects:  Norton, James Adolph, 1922- | Urban League of Cleveland. | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African Americans -- Housing -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Discrimination in housing -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations.
 
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10Title:  Operation Black Unity Records     
 Creator:  Operation Black Unity 
 Dates:  1969-1976 
 Abstract:  Operation Black Unity was a coalition of groups and people, founded in 1969, interested in the progress of the African American population of Cleveland, Ohio. Membership consisted of churches, black nationalists, and civil rights groups. The organization was co-chaired by Reverend Donald S. Jacobs, Reverend Jonathan Ealy, and William O. Walker. One of its main projects was securing African American ownership of McDonald's restaurants in the city of Cleveland. The collection consists of minutes, reports, speech texts, correspondence, pamphlets, brochures, press releases, newspaper clippings, and miscellaneous memorabilia. 
 Call #:  MS 4633 
 Extent:  0.10 linear feet (1 container) 
 Subjects:  Operation Black Unity. | McDonald's Corporation. | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Minority business enterprises -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Franchises (Retail trade) -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African American business enterprises -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Fast food restaurants -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations.
 
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11Title:  Russell Howard Davis Papers     
 Creator:  Davis, Russell Howard 
 Dates:  1897-1977 
 Abstract:  Russell Howard Davis (1897-1976) was an educator, community activist, historian, and author of the first comprehensive history of African Americans in Cleveland, Ohio. Davis drew from his brother Harry's unfinished manuscript on Blacks in Cleveland and published it in two volumes, Memorable Negroes in Cleveland's Past (1969) and Black Americans in Cleveland (1974). The collection consists of family records and histories, correspondence, organizational records and notes, manuscripts by Davis and other authors, and miscellaneous printed materials and newspaper clippings. 
 Call #:  MS 4031 
 Extent:  10.81 linear feet (12 containers and 1 oversize folder) 
 Subjects:  Davis, Russell Howard, 1897-1976. | Davis family. | National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Cleveland Branch -- History. | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | School integration -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Aged -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Politics and government. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations.
 
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12Title:  Stella G. White Papers     
 Creator:  White, Stella G. 
 Dates:  1941-1975 
 Abstract:  Stella G. White (1907-1991) was a freelance journalist and leader in Cleveland, Ohio, mass transit and interracial community relations. She served on the Community Relations Board, the Council on Human Relations, and the Board of the Cleveland Transit System. She was a columnist for the Plain Dealer. The collection consists of certificates, clippings, correspondence, columns, memorabilia, speeches, American Transit Association files, and Cleveland Transit System files. 
 Call #:  MS 4113 
 Extent:  1.40 linear feet (2 containers) 
 Subjects:  White, Stella G., 1907-1991. | Women journalists -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Journalists -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African American women -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Afro-American women journalists -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Local transit -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Race relations and the press -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations.
 
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13Title:  Future Outlook League Records     
 Creator:  Future Outlook League 
 Dates:  1935-1959 
 Abstract:  The Future Outlook League was a Cleveland, Ohio, civil rights organization founded in 1935 by John Oliver Holly to promote employment, mobility, and equality for black youth and young adults in the Central area. Holly, the League's first president, was a political office holder in the area. The idea for the League grew out of dissatisfaction with the achievements of existing Negro organizations concerning employment. The organization appealed to both unskilled and semi-skilled Afro-Americans and was one of the first black organizations in the late 1930s to use picketing and economic boycotts to secure employment for Negroes. Supported primarily by weekly fees assessed to those who obtained jobs through the League, the organization integrated staffs of banks, stores, utilities, and industry. Integration of area neighborhoods was also a concern. The collection consists of minutes, financial materials, subject files, scrapbooks, and membership cards. The collection pertains largely to the establishment of the League and its activities in promoting employment and civil rights on behalf of Cleveland's black community. The membership cards reveal characteristics of that community by providing information on marital status, age, occupation, education, and residence. The scrapbooks detail the League's activities against small, local establishments, as well as national chains, such as the A&P Company, Belle Vernon Products, Lawson's Stores, and People's Drug Stores. 
 Call #:  MS 4171 
 Extent:  5.91 linear feet (13 containers and 1 oversize folder) 
 Subjects:  Future Outlook League. | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African Americans -- Civil rights -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African Americans -- Employment -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Race discrimination -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Black power -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Boycott -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Picketing -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Social conditions.
 
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14Title:  Urban League of Cleveland Records, Series II     
 Creator:  Urban League of Cleveland 
 Dates:  1964-1981 
 Abstract:  The Urban League of Cleveland was organized in 1917, in Cleveland, Ohio, as the Negro Welfare Association of Cleveland to aid the adjustment of black workers coming to Cleveland during the Great Migration following World War I. Led by Wm. R. Conners for the first 25 years, it joined the National Urban League in 1930 and changed its name to the Urban League of Cleveland in 1940. Formed initially to confront barriers to economic opportunities and find jobs for black workers, by the 1930s the primary goal of the League was the issue of improved housing. Its purpose is interracial planning to help the community devise solutions to social and economic problems. The collection consists of minutes, correspondence, newspaper clippings, reports, contracts, memoranda and other papers relating to the organization's operation, especially Operation Equality, a subdivision of the organization concerned with fair housing issues. This collection is essential for those interested in the issues of race relations and open housing in Cleveland. Records and reports of organizations such as Operation Equality, the Fair Housing Council, which consisted of several local fair housing groups including Operation Equality, and National Neighbors, a national organization which promoted peaceful integration, comprise a large part of the collection. 
 Call #:  MS 4206 
 Extent:  10.00 linear feet (10 containers) 
 Subjects:  Urban League of Cleveland -- Archives. | African Americans -- Employment -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African Americans -- Housing -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Discrimination in housing -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Discrimination in housing -- Law and legislation -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Discrimination in employment -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Affirmative action programs -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations.
 
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15Title:  Reuben and Dorothy Silver Papers     
 Creator:  Silver, Reuben and Dorothy 
 Dates:  1949-1975 
 Abstract:  Reuben and Dorothy Silver were active in Karamu House, a performing arts center and theater, founded in 1915 as an interracial social settlement in Cleveland, Ohio. During their tenure, the Silvers were instrumental in presenting works by African American authors such as Langston Hughes and LeRoi Jones, as well as classics from the American theater. Urban unrest in the community surrounding Karamu and the growing popularity of the Black Arts Movement in the 1960s and 1970s forced a reconsideration of Karamu's goals as they related to interracial theater. During this period, Karamu endured major personnel and financial crises. The collection consists of minutes, reports, correspondence, memoranda, press releases, newspaper clippings, publications, playscripts, schedules, programs, and handbills. Most of the material contained in this collection is concerned with Karamu House and the Silvers' roles there as Theater Director and Theater Assistant from 1955-1976. 
 Call #:  MS 4533 
 Extent:  0.80 linear feet (2 containers) 
 Subjects:  Silver, Reuben, 1925- | Silver, Dorothy, 1929- | Karamu House. | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African Americans in the performing arts -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African American theater -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African American dramatists -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Theater -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Social settlements -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations.
 
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16Title:  Reuben and Dorothy Silver Papers, Series II     
 Creator:  Silver, Reuben and Dorothy 
 Dates:  1915-1991 
 Abstract:  Reuben and Dorothy Silver were active in Karamu House, a performing arts center and theater, founded in 1915 as an interracial social settlement in Cleveland, Ohio. During their tenure, the Silvers were instrumental in presenting works by African American authors such as Langston Hughes and LeRoi Jones, as well as classics from the American theater. Urban unrest in the community surrounding Karamu and the growing popularity of the Black Arts Movement in the 1960s and 1970s forced a reconsideration of Karamu's goals as they related to interracial theater. During this period, Karamu endured major personnel and financial crises. The collection consists of audition notices, correspondence, index card notes for a dissertation on Karamu House, Karamu House 75th Anniversary materials, a program manuscript, magazines, newsletters, newspaper clippings, obituaries, play reviews, press releases, theater and workshop programs, minutes, reports, cast and crew lists, play posters, program schedules, and memorabilia. 
 Call #:  MS 4643 
 Extent:  0.70 linear feet (2 containers and 1 oversize folder) 
 Subjects:  Silver, Reuben, 1925- | Silver, Dorothy, 1929- | Karamu House. | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African Americans in the performing arts -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African American theater -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African American dramatists -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Theater -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Social settlements -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations.
 
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17Title:  George Forbes Papers     
 Creator:  Forbes, Geoge 
 Dates:  1966-1990 
 Abstract:  George L. Forbes (b. 1931) was arguably the most powerful man in Cleveland, Ohio, politics during the 1970s and 1980s. His position as the President of Cleveland City Council from 1974-1989 was crucial in the relationships he formed with mayors Dennis Kucinich and George Voinovich which were sometimes contentious. He also used this prominent position to promote civil rights and minority-owned businesses. Forbes was born in Memphis, Tennessee, on April 4, 1931, coming to the Cleveland area in the 1950s to earn his degrees from Baldwin Wallace College in 1957 and the Cleveland Marshall College of Law in 1961. A lawyer by profession, Forbes was admitted to both the Ohio and Federal Bars in 1962. In 1963 he was elected to Cleveland City Council, where he served for 27 years. He assisted Carl B. Stokes in his mayoral runs, helped to establish the 21st District Congressional Caucus to improve race relations within the Democratic party, and formed the first African-American law firm in Cleveland. He was also involved in a number of civic organizations, including the Cleveland Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), where he served as President from 1992-2012, The Urban League, The Council of Economic Opportunity, the Businessmen's Interracial Committee on Community Affairs, the John Harlan Law Club, and the National Association of Defense Lawyers for Criminal Cases. Currently (as of May 2012), he is involved in the Freedom to Marry movement to end marriage discrimination against gay couples in Ohio and has resigned from the NAACP Presidency. George L. Forbes has also been embroiled in numerous controversies during his political life. He was acquitted of bribery, extortion, and theft in office in 1979, has plead guilty to ethics violations in dealing with the Ohio Bureau of Workers Compensation in 2007, and was sanctioned by the Ohio Supreme Court in 2008, which put his law license in jeopardy. During his career he has advocated for the poor and minority groups. He has worked against racial discrimination within a number of organizations, including the Regional Transit Authority and the Cleveland Police Force, created a mandate that a minimum percentage of construction work within the city be done by minority contractors/workers, and battled to improve inner city schools. The collection consists of awards, certificates, correspondence, financial records, legal documents, newspaper clippings, pamphlets, posters, research materials, speeches, and surveys. 
 Call #:  MS 5136 
 Extent:  2.81 linear feet (4 containers and 1 oversize folder) 
 Subjects:  Forbes, George L., 1931- | Cleveland (Ohio). City Council. | National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Cleveland Branch. | African American politicians -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African American lawyers -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Civil rights -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Political campaigns -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Politics and government. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations.
 
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18Title:  MS 5433 George Forbes Papers, Series II     
 Creator:  George Forbes 
 Dates:  1945-2014 
 Abstract:  George L. Forbes (b. 1931) was arguably the most powerful man in Cleveland politics during the 1970s and 1980s. His position as the President of Cleveland City Council from 1974-1989 was crucial in the relationships he formed with mayors Dennis Kucinich and George Voinovich which were sometimes contentious. He also used this prominent position to promote civil rights and minority-owned businesses. Forbes was born in Memphis, Tennessee, on April 4, 1931, coming to the Cleveland area in the 1950s to earn his degrees from Baldwin Wallace College in 1957 and the Cleveland Marshall College of Law in 1961. A lawyer by profession, Forbes was admitted to both the Ohio and Federal Bars in 1962. In 1963 he was elected to Cleveland City Council, where he served for 27 years. He assisted Carl B. Stokes in his mayoral runs, helped to establish the 21st District Congressional Caucus to improve race relations within the Democratic party, and formed the first African-American law firm in Cleveland. He was also involved in a number of civic organizations, including the Cleveland Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), where he served as President from 1992-2012, The Urban League, The Council of Economic Opportunity, the Businessmen's Interracial Committee on Community Affairs, the John Harlan Law Club, and the National Association of Defense Lawyers for Criminal Cases. He was acquitted of bribery, extortion, and theft in office in 1979, has plead guilty to ethics violations in dealing with the Ohio Bureau of Workers Compensation in 2007, and was sanctioned by the Ohio Supreme Court in 2008, which put his law license in jeopardy. During his career he has advocated for the poor and minority groups. He has worked against racial discrimination within a number of organizations, including the Regional Transit Authority and the Cleveland Police Force, created a mandate that a minimum percentage of construction work within the city be done by minority contractors/workers, and battled to improve city schools. The collection consists of awards, certificates, correspondence, financial records, legal documents, newspaper clippings, pamphlets, photographs, posters, research materials, reports, speeches, survey, and audiovisual recordings. 
 Call #:  MS 5433 
 Extent:  28.01 linear feet (31 containers, including one oversized container and one oversized folder) 
 Subjects:  African American lawyers -- Ohio -- Cleveland | African American politicians -- Ohio -- Cleveland | Forbes, George L., 1931- | Cleveland (Ohio). City Council. | National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Cleveland Branch. | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Civil rights -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Political campaigns -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Politics and government. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations.
 
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19Title:  Karamu House Records     
 Creator:  Karamu House 
 Dates:  1914-1979 
 Abstract:  Karamu House was founded in 1915 in Cleveland, Ohio, by Russell W. and Rowena Woodham Jelliffe, in conjunction with the Second Presbyterian Church Men's Club, as the Neighborhood Association (later as the Playhouse Settlement), a settlement house promoting interracial activities and cooperation through the performing arts. The Jelliffes saw a need to provide activities and social services for the city's growing African American population, in order to assist in their transition from rural Southern life to an urban setting. The Playhouse Settlement was renamed Karamu Theater in 1927. By 1941, the entire settlement had taken the name Karamu House. The Dumas Dramatic Club was created to support and encourage interest and activities in the performing arts. In 1922, the theater troupe's name was changed to The Gilpin Players in honor of noted African American actor Charles Gilpin. During the 1920s and 1930s, works by many accomplished playwrights were produced at Karamu, including those of Zora Neale Hurston, Eugene O'Neill, and Langston Hughes, whose career was launched at Karamu. In 1939, the house was destroyed by fire. Rebuilding was not completed until 1949. The Jelliffes' mission of an interracial institution continued until the late 1960s, when, under the leadership of new director Kenneth Snipes, Karamu's mission became one of promoting African-American theater and plays specifically about the African-American experience. During this time a professional troupe of actors was formed. In 1982, Karamu formally returned to its original mission as an interracial organization. The collection consists of articles of incorporation, building construction applications, historical accounts, minutes, records of the Board of Trustees, reports, proposals, publications, financial records, contribution records, correspondence, play scripts and related information, announcements of events, programs, memoranda, date books, guest books, newspaper clippings, subject files, ledgers, scrapbooks, and student enrollment cards. Notable correspondents include Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, Ida B. Wells, Hubert Humphrey, Eleanor Roosevelt, A. Phillip Randolph, Coretta Scott King, Carter G. Woodson, Eliot Ness, Walter White, Marian Anderson, W.C. Handy, Zora Neale Hurston, Ethel Waters, Countee Cullen, Arna Bontemps, Harry E. Davis, Harry C. Smith, and Jane Edna Hunter. The majority of the papers date from the period after World War II, particularly the 1950s and 1960s. 
 Call #:  MS 4606 
 Extent:  79.21 linear feet (92 containers and 1 oversize folder) 
 Subjects:  Jelliffe, Russell W., 1891-1980. | Jelliffe, Rowena Woodham, 1892-1992. | Hughes, Langston, 1902-1967. | Karamu House. | Gilpin Players. | Second Presbyterian Church (Cleveland, Ohio) Men's Club. | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African Americans in the performing arts -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African American theater -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African American dramatists -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Theater -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Social settlements -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Rural-urban migration -- United States. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations.
 
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20Title:  Stella G. White Papers, Series II     
 Creator:  White, Stella G. 
 Dates:  1943-1991 
 Abstract:  Stella G. White was a free lance journalist, columnist for the Plain Dealer newspaper, and community leader in Cleveland, Ohio. Married first to Judge Charles W. White of Cleveland, she later became the wife of Curtis Lamar Bigham and resided in Dawsonville, Georgia. While in Dawsonville, she was a columnist for The Forum. She was instrumental in the Dawson County, Georgia, courthouse renovation project, and active in the Dawson County Women's Club. The collection consists of resumes, certificates, columns, newspaper clippings, correspondence, military documents, speeches, genealogical materials, book manuscripts, cancer research material, and memorabilia. These papers pertain primarily to White's career as a free lance journalist for the Plain Dealer in Cleveland, Ohio, and as a columnist for The Forum in Dawsonville, Georgia. It also includes some of her other writings. Most of her columns centered around the subject of race relations, housing, legislation, and health care. 
 Call #:  MS 4638 
 Extent:  1.00 linear feet (1 container) 
 Subjects:  White, Stella G., 1907-1991. | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African American women -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Afro-American women journalists -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Afro-American women journalists -- Georgia -- Dawsonville. | Women journalists -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Women journalists -- Georgia -- Dawsonville. | Journalists -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Journalists -- Georgia -- Dawsonville. | Race relations and the press -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations. | Dawson County (Ga.).
 
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