http://www.rssboard.org/rss-specification 720 XTF Search Results (subject=African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland;subject-join=exact;smode=advanced;brand=default;f1-subject=African American theater -- Ohio -- Cleveland.) http://catalog.wrhs.org/collections/search?subject%3DAfrican%20Americans%20--%20Ohio%20--%20Cleveland;subject-join%3Dexact;smode%3Dadvanced;brand%3Ddefault;f1-subject%3DAfrican%20American%20theater%20--%20Ohio%20--%20Cleveland. Results for your query: subject=African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland;subject-join=exact;smode=advanced;brand=default;f1-subject=African American theater -- Ohio -- Cleveland. Tue, 28 Jul 2020 12:00:00 GMT Karamu House Records. Karamu House http://catalog.wrhs.org/collections/view?docId=ead/MS4606.xml Karamu House was founded in 1915 in Cleveland, Ohio, by Russell W. and Rowena Woodham Jelliffe, in conjunction with the Second Presbyterian Church Men's Club, as the Neighborhood Association (later as the Playhouse Settlement), a settlement house promoting interracial activities and cooperation through the performing arts. The Jelliffes saw a need to provide activities and social services for the city's growing African American population, in order to assist in their transition from rural Southern life to an urban setting. The Playhouse Settlement was renamed Karamu Theater in 1927. By 1941, the entire settlement had taken the name Karamu House. The Dumas Dramatic Club was created to support and encourage interest and activities in the performing arts. In 1922, the theater troupe's name was changed to The Gilpin Players in honor of noted African American actor Charles Gilpin. During the 1920s and 1930s, works by many accomplished playwrights were produced at Karamu, including those of Zora Neale Hurston, Euge... http://catalog.wrhs.org/collections/view?docId=ead/MS4606.xml Thu, 01 Jan 2015 12:00:00 GMT Reuben and Dorothy Silver Papers. Silver, Reuben and Dorothy http://catalog.wrhs.org/collections/view?docId=ead/MS4533.xml Reuben and Dorothy Silver were active in Karamu House, a performing arts center and theater, founded in 1915 as an interracial social settlement in Cleveland, Ohio. During their tenure, the Silvers were instrumental in presenting works by African American authors such as Langston Hughes and LeRoi Jones, as well as classics from the American theater. Urban unrest in the community surrounding Karamu and the growing popularity of the Black Arts Movement in the 1960s and 1970s forced a reconsideration of Karamu's goals as they related to interracial theater. During this period, Karamu endured major personnel and financial crises. The collection consists of minutes, reports, correspondence, memoranda, press releases, newspaper clippings, publications, playscripts, schedules, programs, and handbills. Most of the material contained in this collection is concerned with Karamu House and the Silvers' roles there as Theater Director and Theater Assistant from 1955-1976. http://catalog.wrhs.org/collections/view?docId=ead/MS4533.xml Wed, 01 Jan 2014 12:00:00 GMT Reuben and Dorothy Silver Papers, Series II. Silver, Reuben and Dorothy http://catalog.wrhs.org/collections/view?docId=ead/MS4643.xml Reuben and Dorothy Silver were active in Karamu House, a performing arts center and theater, founded in 1915 as an interracial social settlement in Cleveland, Ohio. During their tenure, the Silvers were instrumental in presenting works by African American authors such as Langston Hughes and LeRoi Jones, as well as classics from the American theater. Urban unrest in the community surrounding Karamu and the growing popularity of the Black Arts Movement in the 1960s and 1970s forced a reconsideration of Karamu's goals as they related to interracial theater. During this period, Karamu endured major personnel and financial crises. The collection consists of audition notices, correspondence, index card notes for a dissertation on Karamu House, Karamu House 75th Anniversary materials, a program manuscript, magazines, newsletters, newspaper clippings, obituaries, play reviews, press releases, theater and workshop programs, minutes, reports, cast and crew lists, play posters, program schedules, and memorabilia. http://catalog.wrhs.org/collections/view?docId=ead/MS4643.xml Wed, 01 Jan 2014 12:00:00 GMT Russell and Rowena Jelliffe Papers. Jelliffe, Russell and Rowena http://catalog.wrhs.org/collections/view?docId=ead/MS4737.xml Russell W. and Rowena Woodham Jelliffe were social workers who in conjunction with the Second Presbyterian Church Men's Club of Cleveland, Ohio, founded the Neighborhood Association, popularly known as the Playhouse Settlement, in 1915. Founded primarily to aid African Americans who had migrated to Cleveland from the rural South, Playhouse Settlement offered the usual social services, but gained note for its dramatic and artistic programs. In 1927 the Jelliffes acquired property which was remodeled as a theater and named the Karamu Theater. In 1941, the Settlement was renamed Karamu House. The Jelliffes shared the directorship of Karamu House until their retirement in 1963, after which they served as trustees of the Karamu Foundation. Russell Jelliffe was also an active member of the Urban League, the Cleveland Community Relations Council on Race Relations, the executive committee of the local branch of the NAACP, and the Board of the Cleveland Council of Human Relations. He was involved with the Group Work C... http://catalog.wrhs.org/collections/view?docId=ead/MS4737.xml Wed, 01 Jan 2014 12:00:00 GMT