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'African Americans Ohio Cleveland' in subject Cleveland (Ohio) -- Social conditions. in subject [X]
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African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (11)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Social conditions.[X]
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations. (5)
Community development, Urban -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (5)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Politics and government. (4)
Social settlements -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (4)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Social policy. (3)
Community centers -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (3)
Urban renewal -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (3)
Administrative agencies -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Records and correspondence. (2)
African American mayors -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
African American politicians -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
Boys -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Societies and clubs. (2)
Charities -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
City planning -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Economic conditions. (2)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Economic policy. (2)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Officials and employees. (2)
Community development corporations -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
Friendly Inn Social Settlement (Cleveland, Ohio) (2)
Glenville Shootout, Cleveland, Ohio, 1968. (2)
Hough (Cleveland, Ohio) (2)
Housing -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
Political campaigns -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
Poor -- Ohio -- Cleveland (2)
Social action -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
Social work with African Americans. (2)
Social work with youth -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
Stokes, Carl. (2)
Urban policy -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
Youth -- Employment -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
Adolescent boys -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Societies and clubs. (1)
African American physicians -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
African American women social workers -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
African Americans -- Civil rights (1)
African Americans -- Civil rights -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
African Americans -- Employment -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Air -- Pollution -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Black power -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Boycott -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Businessmen -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Charitable contributions. (1)
Camp Cleveland (Cleveland, Ohio) (1)
Camps -- Ohio -- Chagrin Falls. (1)
Camps -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Appropriations and expenditures. (1)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Foreign population. (1)
Cleveland (Ohio). Mayor's Council on Youth Opportunities. (1)
Cleveland Metropolitan Housing Authority. (1)
Cleveland Transit System. (1)
Cleveland: NOW! (1)
Cleveland: NOW! -- Archives. (1)
Evans, Fred (Fred Ahmed), d.1978. (1)
Fenn College. (1)
Fund raising -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Future Outlook League. (1)
Gangs -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Health planning -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Hiram House Social Settlement (Cleveland, Ohio) (1)
Housing rehabilitation -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Immigrants -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Italian Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Job creation -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Juvenile delinquents -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
League Park Center (Cleveland, Ohio) (1)
Lewis, Fannie M., 1926- (1)
Men -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Societies and clubs. (1)
Near West Side Multi-Service Center (Cleveland, Ohio) (1)
Neighborhood -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Picketing -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Race discrimination -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Recreation -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Recreation and juvenile delinquency. (1)
Recreation centers -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
School facilities -- Extended use -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Social work with delinquents and criminals -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Social workers -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Stokes family (1)
Stokes, Carl (1)
Stokes, Louis (1)
Women social workers -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Women's Philanthropic Union (Cleveland, Ohio) (1)
World War, 1914-1918 -- War work -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Young Men's Christian Association of Cleveland -- Archives. (1)
Youth -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Recreation. (1)
Youth -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
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1Title:  Lolette and George Hanserd Papers     
 Creator:  Hanserd, Lolette and George 
 Dates:  1939-1984 
 Abstract:  George and Lolette Hanserd were well known in the Cleveland, Ohio, African American community for their professional contributions, respectively, in podiatry and social work. In 1952 Lolette began working for the Welfare Federation of Cleveland as a member of the Group Services Council. In 1965 she was named director of a four-year project to improve interracial and intercultural relations for the Federation, after which she became director of the Human Relations Department. In 1971 her position was expanded to include associate director of the Federation of Community Planning, the new name adopted by the Welfare Federation that same year. One year later she became the first black to be named social worker of the year by the Cleveland Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers. Lolette retired from the Federation in 1984. The collection consists of Lolette's professional papers from the Federation for Community Planning, as well as some personal papers of both Lolette and George. The collection pertains primarily to Lolette Hanserd's civic activities and, to a much lesser degree, to George Hanserd's medical career in Cleveland. 
 Call #:  MS 4236 
 Extent:  1.40 linear feet (3 containers) 
 Subjects:  African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African American women social workers -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African American physicians -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Social work with African Americans. | Social workers -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Women social workers -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Social conditions.
 
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2Title:  Friendly Inn Social Settlement Records, Series II     
 Creator:  Friendly Inn Social Settlement 
 Dates:  1900-1954 
 Abstract:  The Friendly Inn Social Settlement is a Cleveland, Ohio, social settlement founded in 1874 by the Woman's Christian Temperance Union and located in various city neighborhoods, including Broadway and Central, Woodland, and Carver Park Estates. The collection consists of scrapbooks, newspaper clippings, and printed materials. The collection is primarily concerned with the Junior Board and includes material relating to its fund raising activities, the 75th anniversary celebration, and other activities. 
 Call #:  MS 4259 
 Extent:  0.40 linear feet (1 container) 
 Subjects:  Friendly Inn Social Settlement (Cleveland, Ohio) | Social settlements -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Camps -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Poor -- Ohio -- Cleveland | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Foreign population. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Social conditions.
 
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3Title:  Young Men's Christian Association of Cleveland Records, Series II     
 Creator:  Young Men's Christian Association of Cleveland 
 Dates:  1868-1977 
 Abstract:  The Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) was established in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1854 with a program of lectures, prayer meetings, a Sunday school and a lending library. It initially focused on missionary and religious work. By 1880 the emphasis shifted toward character development and broadened to include boys as well as men, offering educational and physical training programs. During the 20th century the Y worked with the city's social settlements and welfare agencies, conducted fundraising campaigns during World War I, and increased its efforts to work with young boys. By the 1980s there were over 20 branches in the Cleveland area. The collection consists of minutes of the Cedar Avenue Boys' Branch, 1922-1977; also, general files of the Central YMCA, 1880-1975; publications and reports, including some issues of the Cleveland Red Triangle, the Association Boy, the Junior, News and Notes, and the West Side Boy; East End Branch scrapbook, 1929-1930; Cleveland surveys and studies, 1931-1962; Fenn College publications and reports, 1896-1938; War Work Week scrapbook, 1917; and miscellany. The collection pertains to the activities of the YMCA, including efforts at religious and missionary work, development of character in urban youth, war work, and alleviation of depression-era unemployment. The Cedar Avenue Branch records in particular document the Y's effort to serve Cleveland's black community, beginning in 1922. 
 Call #:  MS 4458 
 Extent:  3.51 linear feet (6 containers and 1 oversize folder) 
 Subjects:  Young Men's Christian Association of Cleveland -- Archives. | Fenn College. | Boys -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Societies and clubs. | Men -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Societies and clubs. | Recreation -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Social work with youth -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | World War, 1914-1918 -- War work -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Charities -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Social conditions.
 
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4Title:  Future Outlook League Records     
 Creator:  Future Outlook League 
 Dates:  1935-1959 
 Abstract:  The Future Outlook League was a Cleveland, Ohio, civil rights organization founded in 1935 by John Oliver Holly to promote employment, mobility, and equality for black youth and young adults in the Central area. Holly, the League's first president, was a political office holder in the area. The idea for the League grew out of dissatisfaction with the achievements of existing Negro organizations concerning employment. The organization appealed to both unskilled and semi-skilled Afro-Americans and was one of the first black organizations in the late 1930s to use picketing and economic boycotts to secure employment for Negroes. Supported primarily by weekly fees assessed to those who obtained jobs through the League, the organization integrated staffs of banks, stores, utilities, and industry. Integration of area neighborhoods was also a concern. The collection consists of minutes, financial materials, subject files, scrapbooks, and membership cards. The collection pertains largely to the establishment of the League and its activities in promoting employment and civil rights on behalf of Cleveland's black community. The membership cards reveal characteristics of that community by providing information on marital status, age, occupation, education, and residence. The scrapbooks detail the League's activities against small, local establishments, as well as national chains, such as the A&P Company, Belle Vernon Products, Lawson's Stores, and People's Drug Stores. 
 Call #:  MS 4171 
 Extent:  5.91 linear feet (13 containers and 1 oversize folder) 
 Subjects:  Future Outlook League. | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African Americans -- Civil rights -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African Americans -- Employment -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Race discrimination -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Black power -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Boycott -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Picketing -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Social conditions.
 
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5Title:  League Park Center Records     
 Creator:  League Park Center 
 Dates:  1952-1970 
 Abstract:  League Park Center, Inc. (f. 1949), located in the Hough neighborhood of Cleveland, Ohio, was started by the Welfare Federation of Cleveland with two social workers in the old business office of League Park (6601 Lexington Ave.), with additional facilities at nearby Dunham Church of Christ. The Center has always had close ties with the Neighborhood Settlement Association, the Center focusing on the "development of Cleveland's inner city youth," with such programs as Headstart and athletic activities. The Center's other interests included improvement of the neighborhood and encouragement of street clubs, which worked for block and street preservation and sometimes promoted youth activities. The collection consists of articles of incorporation, a code of regulations, minutes, annual reports, correspondence, legal and financial papers, project reports, memoranda, newspaper clippings, and pamphlets and posters published by the corporation. 
 Call #:  MS 4238 
 Extent:  2.0 linear feet (2 containers) 
 Subjects:  League Park Center (Cleveland, Ohio) | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Social work with African Americans. | Neighborhood -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Community development, Urban -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Social settlements -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Community development corporations -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Social conditions. | Hough (Cleveland, Ohio)
 
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6Title:  Hiram House Social Settlement Records     
 Creator:  Hiram House Social Settlement 
 Dates:  1893-1972 
 Abstract:  Hiram House is a pioneer Cleveland, Ohio, social settlement founded in 1896 by a group of Hiram College students led by George Bellamy, who later became Commissioner of Recreation for the city of Cleveland. During the height of its growth the settlement offered a full range of social, educational and recreational activities, but since 1948 it has concentrated its resources on Hiram House Camp in the suburb of Chagrin Falls, Ohio. Before 1948 its primary service area was centered in a neighborhood populated primarily by Jews, Italians and African Americans. The collection consists of minutes, resolutions, financial statements, ledger books, legal papers, correspondence, and employment and administrative policy materials of Hiram House, correspondence and legal and financial papers of George Bellamy, and correspondence from Samuel Mather and other supporters of the settlement. 
 Call #:  MS 3319 
 Extent:  38.00 linear feet (78 containers and 17 oversize volumes) 
 Subjects:  Hiram House Social Settlement (Cleveland, Ohio) | Immigrants -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Social settlements -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Community centers -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Recreation centers -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | School facilities -- Extended use -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Camps -- Ohio -- Chagrin Falls. | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Italian Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Social conditions.
 
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7Title:  Friendly Inn Social Settlement Records     
 Creator:  Friendly Inn Social Settlement 
 Dates:  1875-1968 
 Abstract:  The Friendly Inn Social Settlement is a Cleveland, Ohio, settlement house founded in 1874 by members of the Women's Christian Temperance Union. It offered a full range of services and social activities, including an outreach program for delinquent boys. Its service area became the center of Cleveland's African American community. The collection consists of minutes, financial statements, reports, evaluations, club journals, correspondence, newspaper clippings, expense accounts, and records of the Women's Philanthropic Union. 
 Call #:  MS 3526 
 Extent:  5.90 linear feet (13 containers and 1 oversize volume) 
 Subjects:  Friendly Inn Social Settlement (Cleveland, Ohio) | Social settlements -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Community centers -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Boys -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Societies and clubs. | Adolescent boys -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Societies and clubs. | Gangs -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Juvenile delinquents -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Social work with delinquents and criminals -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Social conditions. | Women's Philanthropic Union (Cleveland, Ohio)
 
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8Title:  Fannie M. Lewis Papers     
 Creator:  Lewis, Fannie M. 
 Dates:  1965-1976 
 Abstract:  Fannie M. Lewis (1926-2008) was an African American activist and Cleveland, Ohio, councilwoman. She was involved in a number of Hough neighborhood improvement programs, including Community Action for Youth, Neighborhood Youth Corps, Model Cities Association, and the Citizen's Participation Organization. She became a city councilwoman from Cleveland's Ward 7 in 1982. The collection consists of personal papers and the records and subject files relating to Lewis' work with the Model Cities Association, Neighborhood Youth Corps, and other community organizations. Included are articles of incorporation, bylaws, trustee minutes, monthly reports, financial records, proposals, correspondence, memoranda, residency lists, posters, and newspaper clippings. The collection is useful to the study of Cleveland community development programs and Fanny Lewis' efforts with these programs. Some materials relate to racism, politics, and local government in Cleveland during the 1960s and 1970s. 
 Call #:  MS 4341 
 Extent:  14.00 linear feet (16 containers) 
 Subjects:  Lewis, Fannie M., 1926- | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Community development, Urban -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Community development corporations -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Social action -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Poor -- Ohio -- Cleveland | Urban renewal -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Health planning -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Youth -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Housing -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Hough (Cleveland, Ohio) | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Economic conditions. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Social conditions. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Politics and government. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations.
 
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9Title:  Stokes Oral History Collection     
 Creator:  Cuyahoga Community College, Western Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland State University 
 Dates:  2017 
 Abstract:  Carl Stokes, and his brother Louis, were groundbreaking African-American politicians from Cleveland, Ohio. Carl Stokes became the first black mayor of a major U.S. city when elected in 1967. Louis Stokes was the first African-American congressman from Ohio when he was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1968, a position he held for 15 consecutive terms. During Carl Stokes' two mayoral terms, city hall jobs were opened to blacks and women, and a number of urban renewal projects initiated. Between 1983 and 1994 Carl Stokes served as municipal judge, and in 1994 was appointed by President Clinton as U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of the Seychelles. Louis Stokes began his career as a civil rights attorney and helped challenge the Ohio redistricting in 1965 that fragmented African-American voting strength. In 1967, Louis Stokes argued before the U.S. Supreme Court in the Terry v. Ohio case, also known as the "stop-and-frisk" case. In the 1970s, Louis Stokes served as chair of the House Select Committee on Assassinations and in the 1980s was a noted member of the House Select Committee to Investigate Covert Arms Transactions with Iran. The interviews were conducted during 2017 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Carl Stokes' election as mayor and the election of Louis Stokes to Congress. The collection includes video recordings of 38 individuals, transcripts, interview release forms, and protocols. 
 Call #:  MS 5416 
 Extent:  0.81 linear feet (3 containers) 
 Subjects:  African American mayors -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African American politicians -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Political campaigns -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | City planning -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Officials and employees. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Politics and government. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Social conditions. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Social policy. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Economic policy. | Community development, Urban -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African Americans -- Civil rights | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Stokes, Carl | Stokes, Louis | Stokes family
 
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10Title:  Carl Stokes Papers     
 Creator:  Stokes, Carl 
 Dates:  1956-1972 
 Abstract:  Carl Stokes (1927-1996) was the Mayor of Cleveland, Ohio, from 1967-1971. Stokes was the first African American mayor of a major American city and the first African American Democrat in the Ohio State Legislature, where he served three terms from 1962-1967. As mayor, Stokes launched a number of programs to alleviate the problems of urban decay. Chief among these was Cleveland: NOW!, a joint public and private program with plans to raise $177 million in its first two years to revitalize Cleveland. The program was discredited due to the Glenville Shootout in July, 1968. Under Stokes, Cleveland City Council passed the Equal Employment Opportunity Ordinance, and HUD resumed funding projects aiding in the construction of over 3,000 new low- and middle-income housing units. Stokes became a newscaster with NBC television in 1972, and returned to his law practice in Cleveland in 1980. In 1983, Stokes was elected a municipal court judge. The collection consists of correspondence, memoranda, reports, minutes, and newspaper clippings pertaining to the political career of Carl B. Stokes, including his terms in the Ohio State legislature, his mayoral campaigns, and particularly his tenure as mayor of Cleveland, Ohio. The collection details the organization of the mayor's office, and illustrates the problems that Blacks in the vanguard of social and political progress faced, as well as the challenges faced by any urban leader in the turbulent 1960s and early 1970s. Key events in Stokes' administration are illustrated, including the Glenville Shootout, the hiring and resignation of Safety Director Gen. Ben Davis, the activities of the Mayor's Council on Youth Opportunities, and Cleveland: NOW! The work of then City Council President James Stanton is represented, along with material relating to Stokes' brother Louis. Notable correspondents include Hubert Humphrey, Walter Mondale, Robert F. Kennedy, Spiro Agnew, Cyrus Eaton, Edward Kennedy, George Forbes, Jesse Jackson, and Howard Metzenbaum. 
 Call #:  MS 4370 
 Extent:  104.51 linear feet (107 containers and 1 oversize folder) 
 Subjects:  Stokes, Carl. | Cleveland Metropolitan Housing Authority. | Cleveland Transit System. | Cleveland: NOW! | African American mayors -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African American politicians -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Administrative agencies -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Records and correspondence. | Air -- Pollution -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | City planning -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Community development, Urban -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Political campaigns -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Housing -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Urban renewal -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Urban policy -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Youth -- Employment -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Glenville Shootout, Cleveland, Ohio, 1968. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Politics and government. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Appropriations and expenditures. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Officials and employees. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Economic conditions. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Economic policy. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Social conditions. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Social policy. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations.
 
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11Title:  Cleveland: NOW! Records     
 Creator:  Cleveland: NOW! 
 Dates:  1967-1977 
 Abstract:  Cleveland: NOW! was a multiracial joint public and private program for extensive urban renewal and revitalization in Cleveland, Ohio, created by Mayor Carl B. Stokes following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on April 4, 1968. The program planned to raise $1.5 billion over ten years. The first 2-year phase called for spending $177 million for projects in eight areas: neighborhood housing rehabilitation; accelerated urban renewal; the creation of 16,000 jobs; expansion of small business opportunities; city planning; health, welfare, and day care centers; summer recreation programs for youth; and the construction of Camp Cleveland. The program was discredited due to the Glenville Shootout of July 23, 1968, a gun battle between police and members of the Black Nationalists Organization of New Libya who obtained weapons with funds received indirectly from Cleveland: NOW! Stokes and the NOW! trustees were sued in 1970 by 8 policemen wounded in the shootout, but the suit was dismissed in 1977. Although Cleveland: NOW! met many of its initial goals, the organization ceased activities for the most part after 1970, and was formally dissolved in 1980. The collection consists of articles of incorporation, minutes, board of trustees records, correspondence, financial records, records of the major programs, publicity information, newspaper clippings, and proceedings of lawsuits. The collection pertains to a dramatic, multiracial attempt on a large scale to address and ameliorate a wide range of social ills by initial infusions of large amounts of money. The financial records and contributors correspondence contain detailed information for a possible demographic examination of contributors to the program. 
 Call #:  MS 4501 
 Extent:  3.80 linear feet (5 containers) 
 Subjects:  Stokes, Carl. | Evans, Fred (Fred Ahmed), d.1978. | Cleveland: NOW! -- Archives. | Cleveland (Ohio). Mayor's Council on Youth Opportunities. | Near West Side Multi-Service Center (Cleveland, Ohio) | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Administrative agencies -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Records and correspondence. | Community development, Urban -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Community centers -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Social action -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Youth -- Employment -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Youth -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Recreation. | Glenville Shootout, Cleveland, Ohio, 1968. | Urban renewal -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Urban policy -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Housing rehabilitation -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Social work with youth -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Job creation -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Fund raising -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Recreation and juvenile delinquency. | Charities -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Businessmen -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Charitable contributions. | Camp Cleveland (Cleveland, Ohio) | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Social policy. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Social conditions. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Politics and government. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations.
 
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