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'Cleveland Ohio City Council' in subject
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Cleveland (Ohio). City Council. (7)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Politics and government. (5)
Political campaigns -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (4)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations. (3)
African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
Civil rights -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
Forbes, George L., 1931- (2)
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Cleveland Branch. (2)
Politicians -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
Abortion -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
African American lawyers -- Ohio -- Cleveland (1)
African American lawyers -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
African American politicians -- Ohio -- Cleveland (1)
African American politicians -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Politics and government -- 20th century. (1)
Aged -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Societies and clubs. (1)
Air -- Pollution -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
American Revolution Bicentennial, 1776-1976 -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
City planning -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Appropriations and expenditures. (1)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Economic conditions -- 20th century. (1)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Economic conditions. (1)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Ethnic relations. (1)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Officials and employees. (1)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Politics and government (1)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Politics and government -- 20th century. (1)
Cleveland (Ohio). -- City Council (1)
Cleveland (Ohio). Dept. of Public Safety. (1)
Cleveland (Ohio). Mayor -- Archives. (1)
Cleveland Municipal Light Plant. (1)
Community activists -- Ohio. (1)
Community development -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Community development, Urban -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Consumer movements -- Ohio. (1)
Cuyahoga County (Ohio) -- Appropriations and expenditures. (1)
Cuyahoga County (Ohio) -- Politics and government. (1)
Economic development -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Environmental policy -- Ohio. (1)
Glenville (Cleveland, Ohio) -- Politics and government. (1)
Glenville Shootout, Cleveland, Ohio, 1968. (1)
Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority. (1)
Green movement -- Ohio. (1)
Grievance arbitration -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Gun control -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Hungarian Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Kucinich, Dennis J., 1946- (1)
Local government and environmental policy -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. (1)
Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District. (1)
Ohio -- Politics and government -- 20th century. (1)
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1Title:  Influences on the decision making of the Cleveland City Council    
 Creator:  Greene, Kenneth R. 
 Publication:  Cleveland?,1974?] 
 Notes:  Typescript. Paper by Kenneth R. Greene, Department of Political Science, Allegheny College. Includes bibliographical foot-notes. 
 Call #:  Pam. G168 
 Extent:  23 leaves. 28 cm. 
 Subjects:  Cleveland (Ohio). -- City Council | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Politics and government
 
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2Title:  Jack P. Russell Papers     
 Creator:  Russell, Jack P. 
 Dates:  1931-1977 
 Abstract:  Jack P. Russell was a Cleveland, Ohio, councilman, 1943-1971, council president, 1955-1963, and Democratic majority leader who was born Paul Ruschak, but changed his name in the 1930s. Russell was raised in the Hungarian-American community of Cleveland's Buckeye Road neighborhood and published newspapers in that area, including the Buckeye Press. He was councilman from the 16th ward from 1943 to 1971 and operated several businesses, including the Ohio Fire Protection Systems. The collection consists of scrapbooks and newspaper clippings relating to Russell's career in politics. Also included are memorabilia from campaigns, his Night in Budapest celebrations, and a small amount of correspondence. The collection pertains to the career of a major Cleveland political figure and the Cleveland political arena. 
 Call #:  MS 4457 
 Extent:  3.41 linear feet (8 containers, 7 oversize volumes, and 1 oversize folder) 
 Subjects:  Russell, Jack P. (Jack Paul), 1915-1979. | Cleveland (Ohio). City Council. | Politicians -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Political campaigns -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Hungarian Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Politics and government.
 
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3Title:  Cleveland City Council Records     
 Creator:  Cleveland City Council 
 Dates:  1909 
 Abstract:  The 1909 Cleveland, Ohio, City Council served during the final tenure of Mayor Tom L. Johnson, and prior to Home Rule. At this time, council was embroiled in the controversy over municipal ownership of Cleveland's street railways and the $.03 fare. The controversy was settled with voter approval in 1910 of the compromise "Tayler Grant" which called for "service at cost," a $.03 fare, and city supervision of the Cleveland Electric Railway Company, reorganized as the Cleveland Railway Company. The collection consists of papers dealing with railways and the Street Railway Ordinance, including minutes of meetings of the Council of the Whole, January 20 to October 14, 1909; addresses of attorney Homer H. McKeehan, July 19 and 20, 1909; transcript of the arbitration proceedings before U.S. federal judge Robert W. Tayler (arbitrator) concerning differences between the Cleveland City Council and the Cleveland Electric Railway Company over the proposed Street Railway Ordinance, including Judge Tayler's decision, October 18 to December 1, 1909; and minutes of City Council meetings, October 25 to December 18, 1909. 
 Call #:  MS 0896 
 Extent:  2.40 linear feet (6 containers) 
 Subjects:  Cleveland (Ohio). City Council. | Street-railroads -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Street-railroads -- Law and legislation -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Grievance arbitration -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Politics and government.
 
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4Title:  George Forbes Papers     
 Creator:  Forbes, Geoge 
 Dates:  1966-1990 
 Abstract:  George L. Forbes (b. 1931) was arguably the most powerful man in Cleveland, Ohio, politics during the 1970s and 1980s. His position as the President of Cleveland City Council from 1974-1989 was crucial in the relationships he formed with mayors Dennis Kucinich and George Voinovich which were sometimes contentious. He also used this prominent position to promote civil rights and minority-owned businesses. Forbes was born in Memphis, Tennessee, on April 4, 1931, coming to the Cleveland area in the 1950s to earn his degrees from Baldwin Wallace College in 1957 and the Cleveland Marshall College of Law in 1961. A lawyer by profession, Forbes was admitted to both the Ohio and Federal Bars in 1962. In 1963 he was elected to Cleveland City Council, where he served for 27 years. He assisted Carl B. Stokes in his mayoral runs, helped to establish the 21st District Congressional Caucus to improve race relations within the Democratic party, and formed the first African-American law firm in Cleveland. He was also involved in a number of civic organizations, including the Cleveland Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), where he served as President from 1992-2012, The Urban League, The Council of Economic Opportunity, the Businessmen's Interracial Committee on Community Affairs, the John Harlan Law Club, and the National Association of Defense Lawyers for Criminal Cases. Currently (as of May 2012), he is involved in the Freedom to Marry movement to end marriage discrimination against gay couples in Ohio and has resigned from the NAACP Presidency. George L. Forbes has also been embroiled in numerous controversies during his political life. He was acquitted of bribery, extortion, and theft in office in 1979, has plead guilty to ethics violations in dealing with the Ohio Bureau of Workers Compensation in 2007, and was sanctioned by the Ohio Supreme Court in 2008, which put his law license in jeopardy. During his career he has advocated for the poor and minority groups. He has worked against racial discrimination within a number of organizations, including the Regional Transit Authority and the Cleveland Police Force, created a mandate that a minimum percentage of construction work within the city be done by minority contractors/workers, and battled to improve inner city schools. The collection consists of awards, certificates, correspondence, financial records, legal documents, newspaper clippings, pamphlets, posters, research materials, speeches, and surveys. 
 Call #:  MS 5136 
 Extent:  2.81 linear feet (4 containers and 1 oversize folder) 
 Subjects:  Forbes, George L., 1931- | Cleveland (Ohio). City Council. | National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Cleveland Branch. | African American politicians -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African American lawyers -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Civil rights -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Political campaigns -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Politics and government. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations.
 
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5Title:  Leo A. Jackson Papers     
 Creator:  Jackson, Leo A. 
 Dates:  1943-1996 
 Abstract:  Leo Jackson (1920-1996) was an African American attorney and appeals court judge in Cleveland, Ohio. He was a member of Cleveland's city council from 1957-1970 where he represented the Glenville neighborhood and Ward 24. The collection consists of affidavits, agendas, applications, budgets, campaign literature, campaign signs, case files, certificates, charts, correspondence, court documents, expense statements, flyers, forms, journal entries, judicial opinions, lists, magazine articles, magazine clippings, magazines/publications, manuals, maps, meeting minutes, memoranda, newsletters, newspaper articles, newspaper clippings, notes, notices, ordinances, petitions, reports, resolutions, rosters, speeches/statements/remarks, syllabi, thesis, and transcripts. The collection also includes seven audio tapes, four film reels, 37 black and white photographs, and 12 color photographs. 
 Call #:  5301 
 Extent:  20.51 linear feet (22 containers and 2 oversize folders) 
 Subjects:  African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Politics and government -- 20th century. | Glenville (Cleveland, Ohio) -- Politics and government. | Community development -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations. | Cleveland (Ohio). City Council. | Ohio. Court of Appeals. 8th District.
 
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6Title:  MS 5433 George Forbes Papers, Series II     
 Creator:  George Forbes 
 Dates:  1945-2014 
 Abstract:  George L. Forbes (b. 1931) was arguably the most powerful man in Cleveland politics during the 1970s and 1980s. His position as the President of Cleveland City Council from 1974-1989 was crucial in the relationships he formed with mayors Dennis Kucinich and George Voinovich which were sometimes contentious. He also used this prominent position to promote civil rights and minority-owned businesses. Forbes was born in Memphis, Tennessee, on April 4, 1931, coming to the Cleveland area in the 1950s to earn his degrees from Baldwin Wallace College in 1957 and the Cleveland Marshall College of Law in 1961. A lawyer by profession, Forbes was admitted to both the Ohio and Federal Bars in 1962. In 1963 he was elected to Cleveland City Council, where he served for 27 years. He assisted Carl B. Stokes in his mayoral runs, helped to establish the 21st District Congressional Caucus to improve race relations within the Democratic party, and formed the first African-American law firm in Cleveland. He was also involved in a number of civic organizations, including the Cleveland Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), where he served as President from 1992-2012, The Urban League, The Council of Economic Opportunity, the Businessmen's Interracial Committee on Community Affairs, the John Harlan Law Club, and the National Association of Defense Lawyers for Criminal Cases. He was acquitted of bribery, extortion, and theft in office in 1979, has plead guilty to ethics violations in dealing with the Ohio Bureau of Workers Compensation in 2007, and was sanctioned by the Ohio Supreme Court in 2008, which put his law license in jeopardy. During his career he has advocated for the poor and minority groups. He has worked against racial discrimination within a number of organizations, including the Regional Transit Authority and the Cleveland Police Force, created a mandate that a minimum percentage of construction work within the city be done by minority contractors/workers, and battled to improve city schools. The collection consists of awards, certificates, correspondence, financial records, legal documents, newspaper clippings, pamphlets, photographs, posters, research materials, reports, speeches, survey, and audiovisual recordings. 
 Call #:  MS 5433 
 Extent:  28.01 linear feet (31 containers, including one oversized container and one oversized folder) 
 Subjects:  African American lawyers -- Ohio -- Cleveland | African American politicians -- Ohio -- Cleveland | Forbes, George L., 1931- | Cleveland (Ohio). City Council. | National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Cleveland Branch. | African Americans -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Civil rights -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Political campaigns -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Politics and government. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Race relations.
 
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7Title:  Ohio Citizen Action Records     
 Creator:  Ohio Citizen Action 
 Dates:  1957-1986 
 Abstract:  Ohio Citizen Action (f. 1975), is a statewide environmental organization known for its successful canvass-based tactics. It also has worked on campaign finance reform and consumer rights issues. Founded in 1975 as the Ohio Public Interest Campaign (OPIC), it was initially a coalition of union, senior citizen, church, and community groups that worked on issues such as job loss and economic problems stemming from plant closings, community reinvestment, tax abatement,and financial issues, among others. It became part of Citizen Action, a national coalition of consumer and public action groups from several states, in 1980. Citizen Action at its founding was composed of the Connecticut Citizen Action Group, Illinois Public Action Council, Massachusetts Fair Share, Ohio Public Interest Campaign, and Oregon Fair Share, and had a central office located in Cleveland. It eventually grew to have affiliates in 34 states. However, the national group had some political disagreements and several state affiliates separated from it, including the Ohio group which became Ohio Citizen Action in 1989. The national group eventually disbanded, but Ohio Citizen Action is very active currently, focusing much of its efforts on what it calls "good neighbor campaigns" since the late 1990s. "Good neighbor campaigns" use the strengths of community organizing combined with canvassing and other techniques to stop polluting at major industries. Ohio Citizen Action has had various successes addressing a wide range of issues. As OPIC, it began fighting for advance notification of plant closings shortly after its founding. This became a nationwide campaign that resulted in federal legislation that became law in 1989. It was sponsored by Senator Howard Metzenbaum (D-OH) who championed workers' and consumers' rights. Due to his tenacity in working on such issues, Ohio Citizen Action honored him after his retirement by establishing the Ohio Citizen Action Howard M. Metzenbaum Award in 1995, awarded to individuals who exemplify Metzenbaum's tenacity in fighting for issues that Ohio Citizen Action and Senator Metzenbaum would support. Ohio Citizen Action (as OPIC) also worked on stopping downtown tax abatements in the city of Cleveland and was involved in the debate over the sale of Muny Light. In 1983 it won an anti-trust suit against three northeast Ohio grocery chains for price fixing that resulted in a $20 million dollar award going to one million Cleveland, Akron, and Lorain area households. This was the largest consumer anti-trust settlement in United States history. It also led a movement to pass toxic substance right-to- know legislation in Cleveland and other cities, which became a model for federal right-to-know laws and the Toxic Release Inventory in 1986. As OPIC transitioned into an organization with dues paying members, it changed its name to Ohio Citizen Action in 1989 and began to focus more on the "good neighbor campaigns" described above. It also became more active in the movement for campaign finance reform supporting the successful initiative for term limits for state legislators and winning the campaign for electronic reporting of campaign contributions in Ohio. Ohio Citizen Action, both non-profit and non-partisan, was in 2012 still an active organization with 80,000 members statewide. It continued to train young activists and promote its causes through door-to-door and phone canvassing. It focused on environmental and public health issues as well as money in politics and consumer issues. Since 1995 the group presents the Ohio Citizen Action Howard M. Metzenbaum Award, mentioned above, each year to an Ohioan that exhibits Senator Metzenbaum's "principled tenacity". The collection consists of agendas, annual reports, charts, correspondence, flyers, legislation, lists, magazine articles, maps, meeting minutes, memoranda, newsletters, newspaper articles and clippings, notes, press releases, reports, and testimony. 
 Call #:  MS 5135 
 Extent:  31.20 linear feet (33 containers) 
 Subjects:  Kucinich, Dennis J., 1946- | Ohio Citizen Action. | Ohio Public Interest Campaign. | Cleveland (Ohio). City Council. | Green movement -- Ohio. | Environmental policy -- Ohio. | Local government and environmental policy -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Consumer movements -- Ohio. | Community activists -- Ohio. | Political participation -- Ohio. | Pressure groups -- Ohio. | Public interest -- Ohio. | City planning -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Economic development -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Tax remission -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Ohio -- Politics and government -- 20th century. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Politics and government -- 20th century. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Economic conditions -- 20th century.
 
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8Title:  Ralph J. Perk Papers     
 Creator:  Perk, Ralph J. 
 Dates:  1949-1977 
 Abstract:  Ralph J. Perk was the Cuyahoga County, Ohio auditor, 1963-1971, and mayor of Cleveland, 1972-1977. Perk, the first Republican mayor since 1941, faced big budget deficits which he covered with existing bond funds and general revenue sharing funds, as well as large federal grants from the Nixon administration. Nevertheless, city sewer and public transit systems had to be regionalized to raise operating capital. A Czech-American, Perk was seen as a national leader on ethnic issues. He retired from politics in 1977 after an unsuccessful campaign against John Glenn for the United States Senate in 1974 and a defeat in the 1977 nonpartisan mayoral primary. The collection consists of correspondence, memoranda, financial records, reports, speeches, minutes, news releases, campaign materials, newspaper clippings, invitations, certificates, etc., pertaining to Perk's political career and public service. Mayoral records include voluminous correspondence and a subject file, as well as the records of various secretaries and administrative assistants. Notable issues represented in the papers include the proposed sale of the Municipal Light Plant, a 1977 survey on pornography, abortion, gun control, air pollution, regional sewer and transportation issues, public safety, senior citizens, the federal Model Cities program, urban renewal, and Cleveland's celebration of the 1976 US Bicentennial. Perk's many political campaigns are documented, particularly the 1977 mayoral campaign which resulted in his defeat. His service as county auditor is very well represented in a series of newspaper clippings, which also document such events as the Hough riots of 1966 and the Glenville Shootout of 1968. 
 Call #:  MS 4456 
 Extent:  108.01 linear feet (112 containers and 1 oversize folder) 
 Subjects:  Perk, Ralph J., 1914- | Stokes, Carl. | Cuyahoga County (Ohio). Auditor's office. | Cleveland (Ohio). Mayor -- Archives. | Cleveland (Ohio). City Council. | Cleveland (Ohio). Dept. of Public Safety. | Cleveland Municipal Light Plant. | Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District. | Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority. | Abortion -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | American Revolution Bicentennial, 1776-1976 -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Political campaigns -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Political campaigns -- Ohio -- Cuyahoga County. | Gun control -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Pornography -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Politicians -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Community development, Urban -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Urban renewal -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Air -- Pollution -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Aged -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Societies and clubs. | Glenville Shootout, Cleveland, Ohio, 1968. | Police -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Riots -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Personal rapid transit -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Appropriations and expenditures. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Ethnic relations. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Officials and employees. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Politics and government. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Economic conditions. | Cuyahoga County (Ohio) -- Appropriations and expenditures. | Cuyahoga County (Ohio) -- Politics and government.
 
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