Library Collections Search Results
Modify Search  |  New Searchrss icon RSS | Saved Results (0)
Search:
'Jews Ohio Cleveland History Sources' in subject
Results:  13 Items
Sorted by:  
Page: 1
Subject
Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Sources. (11)
Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History. (7)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- History -- Sources. (4)
Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Social life and customs -- 20th century. (4)
Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Photographs. (4)
Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Social life and customs -- 20th century. (3)
Working class -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (3)
Beth Am Congregation (Cleveland Heights, Ohio). (2)
Conservative Judaism -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 20th century. (2)
Fraternal organizations -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
I.L. Peretz Workmen's Circle School (Cleveland, Ohio) (2)
Jews -- Education -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Genealogy. (2)
Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Sources (2)
Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Religious life -- 20th century. (2)
Synagogues -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 20th century. (2)
Yiddish language -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (2)
Administrative Information (1)
Anshe Chesed Congregation (Cleveland, Ohio). Sisterhood -- Archives. (1)
B'nai Jeshurun Congregation (Cleveland Heights, Ohio) (1)
Benesch, Alfred A. (Alfred Abraham) 1879-1973. (1)
Blossom Music Center -- Photographs. (1)
Brickner, Barnett R. (Barnett Robert), 1892-1958. (1)
Charities -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Genealogy. (1)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Intellectual life -- Photographs. (1)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Social life and customs -- Photographs. (1)
Dance orchestras -- Ohio -- Cleveland (1)
Dance schools -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 20th century -- Photographs. (1)
Etiquette for children and teenagers -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 20th century. (1)
Europe, Western -- Pictorial works. (1)
Fischer, Mabel. (1)
Friendly societies -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Gold, Irving, 1911-1998 (1)
Jewish Theological Seminary of America. American Jewish History Center. (1)
Jewish musicians -- Ohio -- Cleveland (1)
Jewish religious schools -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Jewish way of life -- 20th century (1)
Jews -- Education -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Photographs. (1)
Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland (1)
Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History (1)
Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- 20th century (1)
Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- 20th century. (1)
Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Study and teaching (1)
Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Photographs. (1)
Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Societies, etc. (1)
Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Societies, etc. -- Photographs. (1)
Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- 19th century. (1)
Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Social life and customs. (1)
Manuscript CollectionRequires cookie*
1Title:  Thorman Family Papers     
 Creator:  Thorman Family 
 Dates:  1873-1961 
 Abstract:  Simson Thorman was one of the first Jews to settle in Cleveland, Ohio, coming in 1837, and was responsible for the migration of 19 other Jews from Unsleben, Bavaria, known as the Alsbacher Party, the first major settlement of Jews in Cleveland. His grandson, Harold Thorman, the principal family member represented in the collection, was founder of H.M. Thorman, a women's coat-making firm, and was also associated with the brokerage firm of Joseph Mellen & Miller, Inc. The collection consists of genealogical notes, clippings, correspondence, certificates, wills, and record books. Includes wills of Simson and Regina Thorman, as well as a land title, correspondence regarding property, and record books relating to Simson Thorman; clippings, a memorial tribute to Abba Hillel Silver, and birth, marriage, army discharge and death certificates for Harold Thorman. The collection has value for the study of the origins and development of the Jewish community in Cleveland. 
 Call #:  MS 4228 
 Extent:  0.20 linear feet (1 container) 
 Subjects:  Thorman family. | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Sources. | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Genealogy. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Genealogy.
 
  View Finding Aid  |  View XML  
Visual MaterialsRequires cookie*
2Title:  From generation to generation: history through images : an examination of Jewish continuity in Cleveland, Ohio = Le-dor òva-dor    
 Creator:  Western Reserve Historical Society 
 Cleveland Bureau of Jewish Education (Cleveland, Ohio)
 Publication:  Cleveland Bureau of Jewish Education, Cleveland, Ohio],c1989. 
 Notes:  Title from box. Copyright statement from teacher's guide. Some materials in Yiddish or Hebrew, with English translations. Includes bibliographical references. 
 Call #:  F34ZSL J5F93 
 Extent:  10 student packets + 1 teacher's packet with guide (35 p.) : b&w ill. ; in box 31 x 24 x 8 cm. 
 Subjects:  Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Sources | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Study and teaching
 
  View Full Catalog Record  
Manuscript CollectionRequires cookie*
3Title:  Library Minyan Records     
 Creator:  The Library Minyan 
 Dates:  1987-1999 
 Abstract:  In 1988 the Program Committee of Beth Am Congregation in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, established its Shabbat Library Minyan under the guidance of Rabbi Alan Lettofsky. In 1998 the organization separated itself from Beth Am, becoming an independent non-profit organization. The Library Minyan's stated purpose was to promote traditional, egalitarian Jewish spiritual growth and Jewish learning. The collection consists of agendas, articles of incorporation, budgets, bylaws, correspondence, guidelines, minutes, newsletters, questionnaires, reports, rosters, a schedule, and a speech. 
 Call #:  MS 5379 
 Extent:  0.40 linear feet (1 container) 
 Subjects:  Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History. | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Social life and customs -- 20th century. | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Sources. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Religious life -- 20th century.
 
  View Finding Aid  |  View XML  
Manuscript CollectionRequires cookie*
4Title:  Irving Gold Scrapbook ca. 1930-1936     
 Creator:  Gold, Irving, 1911-1998 
 Dates:   none  
 Notes:  This scrapbook will be of value to researchers interested in American dance music in the 1930s as well as researchers interested in Jewish musicians in the 1930s. Irv Gold and His Orchestra was based in Cleveland, Ohio, but played in other communities including Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Findlay Lake, New York; and Akron, Ohio. The group frequently played at supper clubs and ballrooms, and was broadcast on radio stations. In addition to leading and booking his own band, Gold booked other individuals and groups including Sammy Kaye and Red Nichols and His Famous Orchestra. 
 Call #:  Microfilm 
 Extent:  1 microfilm reel ; 35 mm. 
 Subjects:  Gold, Irving, 1911-1998 | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Sources | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History | Jewish musicians -- Ohio -- Cleveland | Dance orchestras -- Ohio -- Cleveland
 
  View Full Catalog Record  
Manuscript CollectionRequires cookie*
5Title:  Anshe Chesed Congregation Sisterhood Records     
 Creator:  Anshe Chesed Congregation Sisterhood 
 Dates:  1919-1970 
 Abstract:  The Anshe Chesed Congregation Sisterhood is the women's auxiliary of Fairmount Temple (Anshe Chesed Congregation), know as Euclid Avenue Temple, between 1912 and 1957. The group is involved in various social, religious, philanthropic, educational and entertainment activities in Cleveland, Ohio. The collection consists of unpublished histories, minute books, annual committee reports, program materials, and scrapbooks. The collection is useful in the study of the role of women in Reform Judaism. 
 Call #:  MS 4202 
 Extent:  2.80 linear feet (4 containers) 
 Subjects:  Brickner, Barnett R. (Barnett Robert), 1892-1958. | Wolsey, Louis, 1877-1953. | Anshe Chesed Congregation (Cleveland, Ohio). Sisterhood -- Archives. | Sisterhoods -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Sources. | Women, Jewish -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Sources. | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Sources. | Women in Judaism -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Sources.
 
  View Finding Aid  |  View XML  
Manuscript CollectionRequires cookie*
6Title:  Cleveland Jewish History Sources, Series II     
 Creator:  Herman, Shoshana 
 Dates:  1953-1958 
 Abstract:  Cleveland Jewish History Sources, Series II includes materials related to the support of a planned volume on the history of Cleveland, Ohio, Jewry. The research for that volume was conducted between 1954 and 1956 and was supported by the American Jewish History Center (AJHC) of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. The planned volume materialized in 1978 with the publication of Lloyd P. Gartner's History of the Jews of Cleveland (Cleveland: Western Reserve Historical Society and Jewish Community Federation of Cleveland, 1978, 1987). MS. 4621, Cleveland Jewish History Sources consists of over 16,000 index cards containing information about Cleveland's Jewish community obtained primarily from newspapers. These cards have been arranged into fourteen broad categories: Arts; Charities; Clubs and Societies, Various; Community Services; Economic Life; Education; Political Affairs; Population; Sermons and Lectures; Social Life; Synagogues; Synagogue Related; Umbrella Organizations, and Zionism. Sources for this information, which cover the span from the early nineteenth century to the middle of the twentieth, were researched by one team at the AJHC in New York City and another in Cleveland. AJHC researchers culled Cleveland related information from the national Anglo Jewish press; Cleveland researchers Jack Herman (Rabbi, Community Temple) and Judah Rubinstein (subsequently, Research Director, Cleveland Jewish Federation), extracted information from local sources, including the general press, the Anglo Jewish press and Jewish communal records. While MS 4621, Cleveland Jewish History Sources functions as a partial index to the local Jewish press, MS 5111, Cleveland Jewish History Sources Collection, Series II includes background materials for the planned publication project such as correspondence and interviews. In addition, the unpublished papers on aspects of Cleveland Jewish history offer the researcher different perspectives and ideas for other sources. 
 Call #:  MS 5111 
 Extent:  0.20 linear feet (1 container) 
 Subjects:  Fischer, Mabel. | Benesch, Alfred A. (Alfred Abraham) 1879-1973. | Weidenthal, Leo. | Wiesenfeld, Leon, 1885-1971. | Jewish Theological Seminary of America. American Jewish History Center. | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History. | Jews -- Education -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Journalism -- Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Genealogy. | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Sources.
 
  View Finding Aid  |  View XML  
Manuscript CollectionRequires cookie*
7Title:  Beth Am Congregation Records, Series II     
 Creator:  Beth Am Congregation 
 Dates:  1933-1991 
 Abstract:  Beth Am Congregation, a Conservative Jewish congregation in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, was founded in 1933 as the Community Temple by Rabbi Abraham Nowak and a group who belonged to B'nai Jeshurun Congregation (then known as Temple on the Heights). The founders wanted their new synagogue to be more welcoming to all Jews, regardless of their wealth or status. The congregation established administrative offices at 241 Euclid Avenue; services and school classes were held at Coventry School in Cleveland Heights. After meeting at several rented locations, the congregation purchased a large house on Washington Boulevard. By 1940, however, the need was seen for a permanent structure, and a building fund was established. In 1947 Beth Am purchased the Trinity Congregational Church at 3557 Washington Boulevard. The new rabbi, Jack J. Herman, was named the same year. The congregation continued to grow, and by 1956 had 600 families with 500 students in the religious school. A fire in 1957 destroyed much of the lower level of the building, including two Torahs and synagogue records; the congregation met on the campus of John Carroll University until repairs were effected. Rabbi Herman served the congregation until his death in 1969. Rabbi Michael Hecht was installed late in 1970. In 1971 the congregation dedicated a new religious school named for Rabbi Herman, constructed on land adjacent to the synagogue. From 1974 through the congregation's merger with B'nai Jeshurun in 1999, there were financial deficits that made it difficult for the congregation to sustain itself. The Jewish community was moving farther east, and membership decreased. A congregant offered land at the intersection of Cedar and Lander Roads in Mayfield Heights, provided that the membership could raise the monies necessary for a new building. In spite of a positive feasibility study, and plans unveiled by the architectural firm Finegold Alexander and Associates, the fundraising goals were not met and Beth Am sold its Washington Boulevard Building to the New Bible Fellowship Church and merged with B'nai Jeshurun Congregation in 1999. The collection consists of membership records, acknowledgement cards, certificates, and letterhead. This collection is of value to researchers studying the administration of a conservative Jewish congregation, particularly in Cleveland, Ohio. Of interest are letters of correspondence from Rabbi Michael Hecht and the congregation's board members to individual members of the congregation. The correspondence and synagogue records shed light upon the day-to-day operations of synagogues. The membership files, rabbi's letters to specific family members, and death and cemetery information will be of interest to genealogists. 
 Call #:  MS 5151 
 Extent:  0.40 linear feet (1 container) 
 Subjects:  B'nai Jeshurun Congregation (Cleveland Heights, Ohio) | Beth Am Congregation (Cleveland Heights, Ohio). | Conservative Judaism -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 20th century. | Jewish way of life -- 20th century | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- 20th century | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Sources. | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Social life and customs -- 20th century. | Synagogues -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 20th century.
 
  View Finding Aid  |  View XML  
Photograph CollectionRequires cookie*
8Title:  Florence S. Shapero Dancing School Photographs     
 Creator:  Florence S. Shapero Dancing School 
 Dates:  1920-1960 
 Abstract:  Florence S. Shapero (1897-1970) was the premier children's dance and social graces instructor in the Jewish community of Cleveland, Ohio, for forty years. A daughter of Russian Jewish immigrants who arrived in the United States in 1891, she received her schooling in Cleveland, graduting from Central High School ca. 1915. Following her graduation, Shapero pursued ballet training in New York City. She returned to Cleveland in the 1920s, opening her first studio in 1929 in rented space in the Masonic Hall at 1949 East 105th Street. She remained in this studio which was close to the heavily Jewish population area of Glenville until the population shifts to the suburbs in the late 1940s and early 1950s. By 1952, Shapero had relocated to Cleveland Heights, where much of Cleveland's Jewish population had resettled. She maintained a studio in the Masonic Temple at 1633 Lee Road and continued teaching dance and the social graces which accompany it until her death almost twenty years later in 1970. The collection consists of sixty-three black-and-white prints, one of which is a hand-tinted portrait. Twenty-five of the prints are oversize. The bulk of the collection consists of group portraits of classes from the 1940s and 1950s. 
 Call #:  PG 296 
 Extent:  0.30 linear feet (1 container) 
 Subjects:  Shapero, Florence S., 1897-1970 -- Photographs. | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History. | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Sources. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Social life and customs -- 20th century. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Photographs. | Dance schools -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 20th century -- Photographs. | Etiquette for children and teenagers -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 20th century. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- History -- Sources.
 
  View Finding Aid  |  View XML  
  
Photograph CollectionRequires cookie*
9Title:  Workmen's Circle of Cleveland Photographs, Series II     
 Creator:  Workmen's Circle of Cleveland 
 Dates:  1932-1984 
 Abstract:  Workmen's Circle of Cleveland, Ohio, (f. 1904) is a secular Jewish fraternal organization formed in the United States to perpetuate Yiddish language and culture, support and promote the liberal political agenda, offer both health and death benefits, and provide a meeting place for fellowship. The collection consists of 219 black-and-white prints, 32 color prints, and 5 hand-tinted prints primarily from Branch 1030 (f. 1939). Included are individual portraits, group portraits of outing, parties, and events, such as a banquet, a branch installation, and Decoration Day. 
 Call #:  PG 523 
 Extent:  0.20 linear feet (1 container) 
 Subjects:  Workmen's Circle (U.S.) -- Ohio -- Cleveland. -- Photographs. | Workmen's Circle (U.S.) -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Photograph collections. | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History. | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Sources. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Social life and customs -- 20th century. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Photographs. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Societies, etc. -- Photographs. | Friendly societies -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Working class -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Jewish religious schools -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- History -- Sources.
 
  View Finding Aid  |  View XML  
  
Photograph CollectionRequires cookie*
10Title:  Joseph Family Photographs     
 Creator:  Joseph Family 
 Dates:  1845-1990 
 Abstract:  The Joseph Family is a prominent Cleveland, Ohio, Jewish family. The family has been very active in both leadership and support for a number of cultural and social institutions in Cleveland such as the Musical Arts Association (The Cleveland Orchestra), Bellefaire and the Jewish Family Service Association. The collection consists of twenty-three photographic albums and 109 black-and-white and 75 color prints. Most of the photographs in the albums and the 184 prints are family portraits. A lesser number are views from travels of various members of the Joseph family. The collection also contains some individual portraits of prominent Cleveland residents. 
 Call #:  PG 524 
 Extent:  7.60 linear feet (4 containers and 10 oversize volumes) 
 Subjects:  Joseph family -- Photographs. | Blossom Music Center -- Photographs. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- 19th century. | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History. | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Sources. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Social life and customs. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Photographs. | Charities -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- History -- Sources. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Intellectual life -- Photographs. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Social life and customs -- Photographs. | Europe, Western -- Pictorial works.
 
  View Finding Aid  |  View XML  
  
Photograph CollectionRequires cookie*
11Title:  Beth Am Congregation Photographs     
 Creator:  Beth Am Congregation 
 Dates:  1950-1998 
 Abstract:  Beth Am Congregation, a Conservative Jewish congregation in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, was founded in 1933 as the Community Temple by Rabbi Abraham Nowak and a group who belonged to B'nai Jeshurun Congregation (then known as Temple on the Heights). The founders wanted their new synagogue to be more welcoming to all Jews, regardless of their wealth or status. The congregation established administrative offices at 241 Euclid Avenue; services and school classes were held at Coventry School in Cleveland Heights. After meeting at several rented locations, the congregation purchased a large house on Washington Boulevard. By 1940, however, the need was seen for a permanent structure, and a building fund was established. In 1947 Beth Am purchased the Trinity Congregational Church at 3557 Washington Boulevard. The new rabbi, Jack J. Herman, was named the same year. The congregation continued to grow, and by 1956 had 600 families with 500 students in the religious school. A fire in 1957 destroyed much of the lower level of the building, including two Torahs and synagogue records; the congregation met on the campus of John Carroll University until repairs were effected. Rabbi Herman served the congregation until his death in 1969. Rabbi Michael Hecht was installed late in 1970. In 1971 the congregation dedicated a new religious school named for Rabbi Herman, constructed on land adjacent to the synagogue. From 1974 through the congregation's merger with B'nai Jeshurun in 1999, there were financial deficits that made it difficult for the congregation to sustain itself. The Jewish community was moving farther east, and membership decreased. A congregant offered land at the intersection of Cedar and Lander Roads in Mayfield Heights, provided that the membership could raise the monies necessary for a new building. In spite of a positive feasibility study, and plans unveiled by the architectural firm Finegold Alexander and Associates, the fundraising goals were not met and Beth Am sold its Washington Boulevard Building to the New Bible Fellowship Church and merged with B'nai Jeshurun Congregation in 1999. The collection consists of 142 black-and-white and 96 color prints, 17 thirty-five millimeter slides, 24 transparencies, and one rendering. 
 Call #:  PG 525 
 Extent:  0.22 linear feet (1 container and 2 oversize folders) 
 Subjects:  Beth Am Congregation (Cleveland Heights, Ohio). | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History. | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Sources. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Social life and customs -- 20th century. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Religious life -- 20th century. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Photographs. | Conservative Judaism -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 20th century. | Synagogues -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 20th century. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- History -- Sources. | Administrative Information
 
  View Finding Aid  |  View XML  
  
Manuscript CollectionRequires cookie*
12Title:  Workmen's Circle of Cleveland Records, Series III     
 Creator:  Workmen's Circle of Cleveland 
 Dates:  1916-2004 
 Abstract:  The Workmen's Circle of Cleveland, Ohio (f. 1904) is a secular Jewish fraternal organization formed in the United States to perpetuate Yiddish language and culture, support and promote a liberal political agenda, offer both health and death benefits, and provide a meeting place for fellowship. Its Yiddish cultural programming includes lectures, readings, concerts, third Passover Seders, and the I.L. Peretz Workmen's Circle School, a supplementary program for children. Following World War II and the Holocaust and the continuing acculturation into American life of the descendants of its Yiddish-speaking Jewish immigrant founders, the Workmen's Circle, in Cleveland and nationwide, has been experiencing significant and continuous loss of membership. The Workmen's Circle's group health plan and death benefits, both of which are available on a non-sectarian basis, are the major source of membership. The collection consists of correspondence, ledgers, membership lists, minutes, and programs. 
 Call #:  MS 5088 
 Extent:  1.01 linear feet (1 container and 1 oversize folder) 
 Subjects:  Workmen's Circle (U.S.) | I.L. Peretz Workmen's Circle School (Cleveland, Ohio) | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- 20th century. | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Sources. | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Social life and customs -- 20th century. | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Societies, etc. | Fraternal organizations -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Working class -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Jews -- Education -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Yiddish language -- Ohio -- Cleveland.
 
  View Finding Aid  |  View XML  
Photograph CollectionRequires cookie*
13Title:  Workmen's Circle of Cleveland Photographs, Series III     
 Creator:  Workmen's Circle of Cleveland 
 Dates:  1930-1995 
 Abstract:  The Workmen's Circle of Cleveland (f. 1904) is a secular Jewish fraternal organization formed in the United States to perpetuate Yiddish language and culture, support and promote a liberal political agenda, offer both health and death benefits, and provide a meeting place for fellowship. Its Yiddish cultural programming includes lectures, readings, concerts, third Passover Seders, and the I.L. Peretz Workmen's Circle School, a supplementary program for children. Following World War II and the Holocaust and the continuing acculturation into American life of the descendants of its Yiddish-speaking Jewish immigrant founders, the Workmen's Circle, in Cleveland, Ohio, and nationwide, has been experiencing significant and continuous loss of membership. The Workmen's Circle's group health plan and death benefits, both of which are available on a non-sectarian basis, are the major source of membership. The collection consists of approximately 850 images of the activities of the Workmen's Circle of Cleveland, Ohio, particularly Branch 671E and the I.L. Peretz School. 
 Call #:  PG 560 
 Extent:  0.80 linear feet (2 containers and 1 oversize folder) 
 Subjects:  Workmen's Circle (U.S.) -- Photographs. | Workmen's Circle (U.S.) -- Photograph collections. | I.L. Peretz Workmen's Circle School (Cleveland, Ohio) | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History. | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Sources. | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Social life and customs -- 20th century. | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Photographs. | Jews -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Societies, etc. -- Photographs. | Fraternal organizations -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Working class -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Jews -- Education -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Photographs. | Yiddish language -- Ohio -- Cleveland.
 
  View Finding Aid  |  View XML