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Cleveland (Ohio) -- History -- Sources. (5)
Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Archives. (5)
Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- 20th century. (5)
Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Sources. (5)
Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Social life and customs -- 20th century. (4)
Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Archives (2)
Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- 20th century (2)
Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Sources (2)
Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Religious life -- 20th century. (2)
Synagogues -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 20th century. (2)
American literature -- Jewish authors (1)
American literature -- Women authors (1)
Bellefaire Jewish Children's Home (Shaker Heights, Ohio) (1)
Beth Am Congregation (Cleveland Heights, Ohio). -- Archives. (1)
Beth Israel - The West Temple (Cleveland, Ohio) -- Archives (1)
Blossom Music Center. (1)
Charities -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Chevrei Tikva (Cleveland, Ohio) -- Archives. (1)
Children's literature, American -- Jewish authors (1)
Children's literature, American -- Women authors (1)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- History -- Sources (1)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Intellectual life -- History -- Sources (1)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Intellectual life -- History -- Sources. (1)
Cleveland (Ohio) -- Social life and customs -- History -- Sources. (1)
Conservative Judaism -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 20th century. (1)
Friendly societies -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Jewish Community Federation (Cleveland, Ohio) (1)
Jewish Family Service Association (Cleveland, Ohio). (1)
Jewish gays -- Religious life -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 20th century (1)
Jewish gays -- Religious life -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 21st century. (1)
Jewish law. (1)
Jewish lesbians -- Religious life -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 20th century. (1)
Jewish lesbians -- Religious life -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 21st century. (1)
Jewish religious schools -- Ohio -- Cleveland. (1)
Jewish women -- Ohio -- Cleveland (1)
Jewish women authors (1)
Jews -- Dietary laws. (1)
Jews -- History (1)
Jews -- United States -- Historiography (1)
Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- 19th century. (1)
Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- 21st century. (1)
Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Intellectual life -- 20th century (1)
Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Religious life -- 20th century (1)
Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Social life and customs -- 19th century. (1)
Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Social life and customs -- 20th century (1)
Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Social life and customs -- 21st century. (1)
Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Societies, etc. (1)
Joseph family -- Archives. (1)
Joseph, Emil, 1857-1938. (1)
Joseph, Fanny Dryfoos, 1866-1930. (1)
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1Title:  Workmen's Circle of Cleveland Records, Series II     
 Creator:  Workmen's Circle of Cleveland 
 Dates:  1939-2002 
 Abstract:  The Workmen's Circle of Cleveland (f. 1904) is a secular Jewish fraternal organization formed in the United States to perpetuate Yiddish language and culture, support and promote the liberal political agenda, offer both health and death benefits, and provide a meeting place for fellowship. Its Yiddish cultural programming includes lectures, readings, concerts, third Passover seders, and the I.L. Peretz Workmen's Circle School, a supplementary program for children. Branch 1030, one of a number of Cleveland, Ohio, branches, was the first English speaking branch and was founded in 1939. Following World War II and the Holocaust and the continuing acculturation into American life of the descendants of its Yiddish-speaking Jewish immigrant founders, the Workmen's Circle, in Cleveland and nationwide, has been experiencing significant and continuous loss of membership. The Workmen's Circle's group health plan and death benefits, both of which are available on a non-sectarian basis, are the major source of membership. These programs have had difficulty attracting members since the proliferation of health maintenance organizations and health insurance plans. The collection consists of correspondence, ledgers, membership lists, minutes, and newsletters relating to Branch 1030. Also in the collection are regional records, and national office constitutions, correspondence, and reports. 
 Call #:  MS 4891 
 Extent:  2.02 linear feet (2 containers and 2 oversize folders) 
 Subjects:  Workmen's Circle (U.S.) -- Ohio -- Cleveland. -- Archives. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- 20th century. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Sources. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Social life and customs -- 20th century. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Societies, etc. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Archives. | Friendly societies -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Working class -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Jewish religious schools -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- History -- Sources.
 
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2Title:  Beth Am Congregation Records     
 Creator:  Beth Am Congregation 
 Dates:  1934-1999 
 Abstract:  Beth Am Congregation, a Conservative Jewish congregation in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, was founded in 1933 as the Community Temple by Rabbi Abraham Nowak and a group who belonged to B'nai Jeshurun Congregation (then known as Temple on the Heights). The founders wanted their new synagogue to be more welcoming to all Jews, regardless of their wealth or status. The congregation established administrative offices at 241 Euclid Avenue; services and school classes were held at Coventry School in Cleveland Heights. After meeting at several rented locations, the congregation purchased a large house on Washington Boulevard. By 1940, however, the need was seen for a permanent structure, and a building fund was established. In 1947 Beth Am purchased the Trinity Congregational Church at 3557 Washington Boulevard. The new rabbi, Jack J. Herman, was named the same year. The congregation continued to grow, and by 1956 had 600 families with 500 students in the religious school. A fire in 1957 destroyed much of the lower level of the building, including two Torahs and synagogue records; the congregation met on the campus of John Carroll University until repairs were effected. Rabbi Herman served the congregation until his death in 1969. Rabbi Michael Hecht was installed late in 1970. In 1971 the congregation dedicated a new religious school named for Rabbi Herman, constructed on land adjacent to the synagogue. From 1974 through the congregation's merger with B'nai Jeshurun in 1999, there were financial deficits that made it difficult for the congregation to sustain itself. The Jewish community was moving farther east, and membership decreased. A congregant offered land at the intersection of Cedar and Lander Roads in Mayfield Heights, provided that the membership could raise the monies necessary for a new building. In spite of a positive feasibility study, and plans unveiled by the architectural firm Finegold Alexander and Associates, the fundraising goals were not met and Beth Am sold its Washington Boulevard Building to the New Bible Fellowship Church and merged with B'nai Jeshurun Congregation in 1999. The collection consists of minutes, correspondence, financial reports, lists, newspaper clippings, and publications. 
 Call #:  MS 4895 
 Extent:  39.83 linear feet (43 containers and 3 oversize folders) 
 Subjects:  Beth Am Congregation (Cleveland Heights, Ohio). -- Archives. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- 20th century. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Sources. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Religious life -- 20th century. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Social life and customs -- 20th century. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Archives. | Conservative Judaism -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 20th century. | Synagogues -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 20th century. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- History -- Sources.
 
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3Title:  Beth Israel - The West Temple Records, Series II     
 Creator:  Beth Israel - The West Temple 
 Dates:  1954-2000 
 Abstract:  Beth Israel - The West Temple (f. 1954) is a Reform Jewish synagogue located in Cleveland, Ohio's west side. A noted feature of this congregation is its volunteerism. For the first forty-five years of its history, all posts and jobs, with the exception of rabbi, were staffed by volunteers. This included the principal, administrator, teachers, and aides of the religious school; the librarians, office managers and secretaries; youth group advisors; and interfaith and community education coordinators. Approximately one-third of the congregation made this commitment to volunteer several hours a week throughout the year. Another fifteen percent of the congregation volunteered periodically throughout the year serving as choir director, choir members, and music accompanist; worship leaders and cantors; bulletin editors; and building repair and maintenance workers. The collection consists of minutes, bulletins, correspondence, reports, handbooks, newspaper clippings, program scripts, speeches, and transcripts. 
 Call #:  MS 4904 
 Extent:  4.41 linear feet (5 containers and 1 oversize folder) 
 Subjects:  Beth Israel - The West Temple (Cleveland, Ohio) -- Archives | Prepare the Way Radio Broadcast | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- 20th century | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Sources | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Religious life -- 20th century | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Social life and customs -- 20th century | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Archives | Jewish women -- Ohio -- Cleveland | Synagogues -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Organization and administration | Reform Judaism -- Ohio -- Cleveland | Cleveland (Ohio) -- History -- Sources
 
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4Title:  Bea Stadtler Papers     
 Creator:  Bea Stadtler 
 Dates:  1954-1995 
 Abstract:  Bea Horwitz Stadtler (1921-2000) was a prominent author who lived and worked in the Cleveland, Ohio, metropolitan area for her entire life. Graduating from Glenville High School, she attended Case Western Reserve University and the College of Jewish Studies, obtaining the first Bachelor of Judaica Studies degree awarded by the College of Jewish Studies in 1971. Stadtler served as an educator at B'nai Jeshurun Congregation, Beth Sholom, the Cleveland Hebrew Schools, and the Temple-Tifereth Israel. Stadtler served as registrar at the College of Jewish Studies from 1960-1983 and as assistant editor of the Israel Philatelist. She was active in the Cleveland Holocaust Center. The author of six books and articles, stories and poems that appeared in more that twenty different publications, she also co-wrote a rock opera and created an award-winning filmstrip. Her book The Holocaust: A History of Courage and Resistance received the National Book Council prize for the outstanding juvenile book of 1974-1975. She worked with Rabbi Abba Hillel Silver as he prepared the manuscript for his book Where Judaism Differed. She married Oscar Stadtler in 1943 and was the mother of three children and nine grandchildren. The collection consists of publications, scripts, correspondence, unpublished children's stories, curriculum guides, a libretto, and working drafts for published books. 
 Call #:  MS 4905 
 Extent:  1.00 linear feet (1 container) 
 Subjects:  Stadtler, Bea, 1921-2000. -- Archives | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- 20th century | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Sources | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Intellectual life -- 20th century | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Archives | Jews -- History | Jews -- United States -- Historiography | American literature -- Jewish authors | American literature -- Women authors | Children's literature, American -- Jewish authors | Children's literature, American -- Women authors | Jewish women authors | Stamp collecting -- Israel | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Intellectual life -- History -- Sources
 
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5Title:  Jacob Muskin Papers     
 Creator:  Muskin, Jacob 
 Dates:  1940-1990 
 Abstract:  Jacob Muskin (1920-1990) was a Cleveland, Ohio, rabbi affiliated with the Orthodox movement of Judaism. Born in Chicago, Muskin attended the Ner Israel Rabbinical College in Baltimore. After World War II, he was the associate national director of Va-ad Ha-Hatzalah (the rescue committee, in Hebrew), an organization that saved children and scholars from the Holocaust. He began his pulpit career in Cleveland as the rabbi of the Kinsman Jewish Center in 1950, where he established the first synagogue-sponsored nursery school in the city. In 1959 he helped to orchestrate the merger of Kinsman Jewish Center with other small Orthodox congregations to form Warrensville Center Synagogue in Cleveland Heights. He served as rabbi at Warrensville Center Synagogue until his death in 1990. Muskin was active in many local Jewish organizations. He served on the Kashruth Board, the chaplaincy committee, and the Central Fund for Traditional Institutions, all of the Jewish Community Federation of Cleveland. He was on the board of directors and served on the educational committees of Yeshiva Adath B'nai Israel, the Telshe Yeshiva, and the Bureau of Jewish Education of Cleveland. As a member of the Merkaz Harabonim, the Orthodox Rabbinical Council of Cleveland, he served as chair for six years, often articulating the views of the Orthodox community on issues such as Kashruth, divorce, cemetery practices, holiday observances, and Zionism. The collection consists of correspondence, minutes, newspaper clippings, ledgers, lists, synagogue programs, and legal documents. 
 Call #:  MS 4837 
 Extent:  1.01 linear feet (1 container and 1 oversize folder) 
 Subjects:  Muskin, Jacob, 1920-1990. -- Archives. | Kinsman Jewish Center (Cleveland, Ohio). | Nvai Zedek Congregation (Cleveland, Ohio) | Warrensville Center Synagogue (Cleveland Heights, Ohio). | Orthodox Rabbinical Council of Cleveland. | Jewish Community Federation (Cleveland, Ohio) | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- 20th century. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Sources. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Religious life -- 20th century. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Archives. | Jews -- Dietary laws. | Orthodox Judaism -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 20th century. | Rabbis -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 20th century. | Synagogues -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 20th century. | Jewish law. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- History -- Sources.
 
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6Title:  Joseph Family Papers     
 Creator:  Joseph Family 
 Dates:  1866-1993 
 Abstract:  The Joseph Family is a prominent Cleveland, Ohio, Jewish family. Moritz Joseph arrived in the United States in 1853 from Gauersheim, Rheinpfalz, Germany, during the nineteenth-century German-Jewish immigration period. Settling in Cleveland in 1872, Joseph became successful in the manufacturing ofmen's clothing incorporating that operation as the Joseph and Feiss Company in 1907. The company, formed out of previously operating businesses, was one of the largest manufacturers of men's clothing in the United States. Moritz Joseph married Jette Selig in 1853; the marriage produced four sons. Three of them, Isaac, Fred, and Siegmund, and Siegmund's son Ralph, worked all or part of their careers with the Joseph and Feiss Company. The foruth son, Emil, Emil's son Frank E., and Frank E.'s son William R., became lawyers after graduating from Columbia University Law School. Frank E. Joseph was a promient lawyer and a partner at the Jones, Day, Cockley, & Reavis law firm. The family has been very active in both leadership and philanthropy in Cleveland in institutions such as the Musical Arts Associaton (The Cleveland Orchestra), the Kulas Foundation, and the Warner and Swasey Foundation, and in Jewish communal institutions such as Bellefaire and The Jewish Family Service Association. The collection consists of scrapbooks chronicling the lives of Martha J. Joseph Joseph, Adele Joseph Yelson and Edmil, Frank E. and William R. Joseph. Included in the scrapbooks are correspondence, photographs, programs, and newspaper clippings. The Joseph Family Papers also include the diaries of Emil Joseph from 1877 to 1938 and Ralph S. Joseph from 1903 to 1948, and extensive correspondence of Emil Joseph to Fanny Dryfoos Joseph between 1886 and 1909, and his son, Frank, between 1922 and 1928. 
 Call #:  MS 4894 
 Extent:  40.02 linear feet (37 containers, 11 oversize volumes, and 2 oversize folders) 
 Subjects:  Joseph family -- Archives. | Joseph, Moritz, 1834-1917. | Joseph, Martha J., 1917-2006. | Joseph, Ray K. Hahn, 1888-1937. | Yelson, Adele Joseph, 1944-1977. | Joseph, Emil, 1857-1938. | Joseph, Fanny Dryfoos, 1866-1930. | Joseph, Frank E., 1904-1995. | Joseph, Ralph S., 1888-1958. | Joseph, William R., 1946- | Blossom Music Center. | Musical Arts Association (Cleveland, Ohio) | Jewish Family Service Association (Cleveland, Ohio). | Bellefaire Jewish Children's Home (Shaker Heights, Ohio) | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- 19th century. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- 20th century. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Sources. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Social life and customs -- 19th century. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Social life and customs -- 20th century. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Archives. | Charities -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Nonprofit organizations -- Ohio -- Cleveland. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- History -- Sources. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Intellectual life -- History -- Sources. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- Social life and customs -- History -- Sources.
 
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7Title:  Chevrei Tikva Records     
 Creator:  Chevrei Tikva 
 Dates:  1983-2002 
 Abstract:  Chevrei Tikva, a religious congregation organized to meet the needs of gay, lesbian, and transgendered Jews, was founded in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1983. The name Chevrei Tikva (Hebrew for "friends of hope") was chosen in Hovember 1983. Religious services were initially held in members' homes. From 1984-1989 the group met at The Civic, 3130 Mayfield Road, in Cleveland Heights. The congregation acquired its Torah scroll in 1986, and introduced varied programming, including Sabbath and holiday services, Passover seders, house dedications, and baby namings. In 1989 the congregation moved its services to the Unitarian Universalist Society of Cleveland, 2728 Lancashire Road, in Cleveland Heights, and also affiliated with the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, which is the synagogue association of the Reform movement. In 2001 Rachel Rembrandt, a graduate of Hebrew Union College, became the congregations' first permanent rabbi. The collection consists of newsletters, minutes, program flyers, lists, correspondence, calendars, prayer services and reports. 
 Call #:  MS 4874 
 Extent:  2.01 linear feet (4 containers and 1 oversize folder) 
 Subjects:  Chevrei Tikva (Cleveland, Ohio) -- Archives. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- 20th century. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- 21st century. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- History -- Sources. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Social life and customs -- 20th century. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Social life and customs -- 21st century. | Jews -- United States -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Archives. | Jewish gays -- Religious life -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 20th century | Jewish gays -- Religious life -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 21st century. | Jewish lesbians -- Religious life -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 20th century. | Jewish lesbians -- Religious life -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 21st century. | Transsexuals -- Religious life -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 20th century. | Transsexuals -- Religious life -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 21st century. | Reform Judaism -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 20th century. | Reform Judaism -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- 21st century. | Cleveland (Ohio) -- History -- Sources.
 
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